Fidelity D & D Bancorp, Inc (FDBC) - Description of business


Watch the video to learn about the probability of Fidelity D & D Bancorp, Inc (FDBC) Chart Signal as of Apr 18 2014

Hotstocked Precision will calculate the probabilities of Fidelity D & D Bancorp, Inc (FDBC)

Rating:
Size: 656KB
Version: 1.1
Platform: Win/Mac
Downloads:
FREE DOWNLOAD
Company Description


The Company’s business is subject to interest rate risk and variations in interest rates may negatively affect its financial performance.

Changes in the interest rate environment may reduce profits.  The Company’s earnings and cash flows are largely dependent upon its net interest income. Net interest income is the difference between the interest earned on loans, securities and other interest-earning assets, and interest paid on deposits, borrowings and other interest-bearing liabilities.  As prevailing interest rates change, net interest spreads are affected by the difference between the maturities and re-pricing characteristics of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities.  In addition, loan volume and yields are affected by market interest rates on loans, and rising interest rates generally are associated with a lower volume of loan originations. An increase in the general level of interest rates may also adversely affect the ability of certain borrowers to pay the interest on and principal of their obligations.  Accordingly, changes in levels of market interest rates could materially adversely affect the Company’s net interest spread, asset quality, loan origination volume and overall profitability.

The Company is subject to lending risk.

There are inherent risks associated with the Company’s lending activities.  These risks include, among other things, the impact of changes in interest rates and changes in the economic conditions in the markets where the Company operates as well as those across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the United States.  Increases in interest rates and/or weakening

economic conditions could adversely impact the ability of borrowers to repay outstanding loans or the value of the collateral securing these loans.  The Company is also subject to various laws and regulations that affect its lending activities.  Failure to comply with applicable laws and regulations could subject the Company to regulatory enforcement action that could result in the assessment of significant civil money penalties against the Company.

As of December 31, 2006, approximately 55% of the Company’s loan portfolio consisted of commercial, commercial real estate and real estate construction loans.  These types of loans are generally viewed as having more risk of default than residential real estate loans or consumer loans.  These types of loans are also typically larger than residential real estate loans and consumer loans.  Because the Company’s loan portfolio contains a significant number of commercial, commercial real estate and construction loans with relatively large balances, the deterioration of one or a few of these loans could cause a significant increase in non-performing loans.  An increase in non-performing loans could result in a net loss of earnings from these loans, an increase in the provision for possible loan losses and an increase in loan charge-offs, all of which could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.

The Company’s allowance for possible loan losses may be insufficient.

The Company maintains an allowance for possible loan losses, which is a reserve established through a provision for possible loan losses charged to expense, that represents Management’s best estimate of probable losses that have been incurred within the existing portfolio of loans.  The allowance, in the judgment of Management, is necessary to reserve for estimated loan losses and risks inherent in the loan portfolio.  The level of the allowance reflects Management’s continuing evaluation of industry concentrations; specific credit risks; loan loss experience; current loan portfolio quality; present economic, political and regulatory conditions and unidentified losses inherent in the current loan portfolio.  The determination of the appropriate level of the allowance for possible loan losses inherently involves a high degree of subjectivity and requires the Company to make significant estimates of current credit risks and future trends, all of which may undergo material changes.  Changes in economic conditions affecting borrowers, new information regarding existing loans, identification of additional problem loans and other factors, both within and outside of the Company’s control, may require an increase in the allowance for possible loan losses.  In addition, bank regulatory agencies periodically review the Company’s allowance for loan losses and may require an increase in the provision for possible loan losses or the recognition of further loan charge-offs, based on judgments different than those of Management.  In addition, if charge-offs in future periods exceed the allowance for possible loan losses, the Company will need additional provisions to increase the allowance for possible loan losses.  Any increases in the allowance for loan losses will result in a decrease in net income and, capital, and may have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.

The Company is subject to environmental liability risk associated with lending activities.

A significant portion of the Company’s loan portfolio is secured by real property.  During the ordinary course of business, the Company may foreclose on and take title to properties securing certain loans.  In doing so, there is a risk that hazardous or toxic substances could be found on these properties.  If hazardous or toxic substances are found, the Company may be liable for remediation costs, as well as for personal injury and property damage.  Environmental laws may require the Company to incur substantial expenses and may materially reduce the affected property’s value or limit the Company’s ability to use or sell the affected property.  In addition, future laws or more stringent interpretations or enforcement policies with respect to existing laws may increase the Company’s exposure to environmental liability.  Although the Company has policies and procedures to perform an environmental review before initiating any foreclosure action on real property, these reviews may not be sufficient to detect all potential environmental hazards.  The remediation costs and any other financial liabilities associated with an environmental hazard could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.

The Company’s profitability depends significantly on economic conditions in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the local region in which it conducts business.

The Company’s success depends primarily on the general economic conditions of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the specific local markets in which the Company operates.  Unlike larger national or other regional banks that are more geographically diversified, the Company provides banking and financial services to customers primarily in Lackawanna and Luzerne Counties.  The local economic conditions in these areas have a significant impact on the demand for the Company’s products and services as well as the ability of the Company’s customers to repay loans, the value of the collateral securing loans and the stability of the Company’s deposit funding sources.  A significant decline in general economic conditions, caused by inflation, recession, acts of terrorism, an outbreak of hostilities or other international or domestic occurrences, unemployment, changes in securities markets or other factors could impact these local economic conditions and, in turn, have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.

There is no assurance that the Company will be able to successfully compete with others for business.

The Company competes for loans, deposits and investment dollars with numerous regional and national banks and other community banking institutions, as well as other kinds of financial institutions and enterprises, such as securities firms, insurance companies, savings associations, credit unions, mortgage brokers, and private lenders.  Many competitors have substantially greater resources than the Company does, and operate under less stringent regulatory environments.  The differences in resources and regulations may make it more difficult for the Company to compete profitably, reduce the rates that it can earn on loans and investments, increase the rates it must offer on deposits and other funds, and adversely affect its overall financial condition and earnings.

The Company is subject to extensive government regulation and supervision.

The Company, primarily through the Bank, is subject to extensive federal and state regulation and supervision.  Banking regulations are primarily intended to protect depositors’ funds, federal deposit insurance funds and the banking system as a whole, not shareholders.  These regulations affect the Company’s lending practices, capital structure, investment practices, dividend policy and growth, among other things.  Federal or commonwealth regulatory agencies continually review banking laws, regulations and policies for possible changes.  Changes to statutes, regulations or regulatory policies, including changes in interpretation or implementation of statutes, regulations or policies, could affect the Company in substantial and unpredictable ways.  Such changes could subject the Company to additional costs, limit the types of financial services and products the Company may offer and/or increase the ability of non-banks to offer competing financial services and products, among other things.  Failure to comply with laws, regulations or policies could result in sanctions by regulatory agencies, civil money penalties and/or reputation damage, which could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition and results of operations.  While the Company has policies and procedures designed to prevent any such violations, there can be no assurance that such violations will not occur.

The Company’s controls and procedures may fail or be circumvented.

Management regularly reviews and updates the Company’s internal controls, disclosure controls and procedures, and corporate governance policies and procedures.  Any system of controls, however well designed and operated, is based in part on certain assumptions and can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurances that the objectives of the system are met.  Any failure or circumvention of the Company’s controls and procedures or failure to comply with regulations related to controls and procedures could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, results of operations and financial condition.

New lines of business or new products and services may subject the Company to additional risks.

From time-to-time, the Company may implement new lines of business or offer new products and services within existing lines of business.  There are substantial risks and uncertainties associated with these efforts, particularly in instances where the markets are not fully developed.  In developing and marketing new lines of business and/or new products and services the Company may invest significant time and resources.  Initial timetables for the introduction and development of new lines of business and/or new products or services may not be achieved and price and profitability targets may not prove feasible.  External factors, such as compliance with regulations, competitive alternatives, and shifting market preferences, may also impact the successful implementation of a new line of business or a new product or service.  Furthermore, any new line of business and/or new product or service could have a significant impact on the effectiveness of the Company’s system of internal controls.  Failure to successfully manage these risks in the development and implementation of new lines of business or new products or services could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, results of operations and financial condition.

The Company’s ability to pay dividends depends primarily on dividends from its banking subsidiary, which is subject to regulatory limits.

The Company is a bank holding company and its operations are conducted by its subsidiary.  Its ability to pay dividends depends on its receipt of dividends from its subsidiary.  Dividend payments from its banking subsidiary are subject to legal and regulatory limitations, generally based on net profits and retained earnings, imposed by the various banking regulatory agencies.  The ability of its subsidiary to pay dividends is also subject to its profitability, financial condition, capital expenditures and other cash flow requirements.  There is no assurance that its subsidiary will be able to pay dividends in the future or that the Company will generate adequate cash flow to pay dividends in the future.  The Company’s failure to pay dividends on its common stock could have a material adverse effect on the market price of its common stock.

The Company’s future acquisitions could dilute your ownership and may cause it to become more susceptible to adverse economic events.

The Company may use its common stock to acquire other companies or make investments in banks and other complementary businesses in the future.  The Company may issue additional shares of common stock to pay for future acquisitions, which would dilute your ownership interest in the Company.  Future business acquisitions could be material to the Company, and the degree of success achieved in acquiring and integrating these businesses into the Company could have a material effect on the value of the Company’s common stock.  In addition, any acquisition could require it to use substantial cash or other liquid assets or to incur debt.  In those events, it could become more susceptible to economic downturns and competitive pressures.

The Company may not be able to attract and retain skilled people.

The Company’s success depends, in large part, on its ability to attract and retain key people.  Competition for the best people in most activities engaged in by the Company can be intense and the Company may not be able to hire people or to retain them.  The unexpected loss of services of one or more of the Company’s key personnel could have a material adverse impact on the Company’s business because of their skills, knowledge of the Company’s market, years of industry experience and the difficulty of promptly finding qualified replacement personnel.  The Company has an employment agreement with its President and Chief Executive Officer.

The Company’s information systems may experience an interruption or breach in security.

The Company relies heavily on communications and information systems to conduct its business.  Any failure, interruption or breach in security of these systems could result in failures or disruptions in the Company’s customer relationship management, general ledger, deposit, loan and other systems.  While the Company has policies and procedures designed to prevent or limit the effect of the failure, interruption or security breach of its information systems, there can be no assurance that any such failures, interruptions or security breaches will not occur or, if they do occur, that they will be adequately addressed.  The occurrence of any failures, interruptions or security breaches of the Company’s information systems could damage the Company’s reputation, result in a loss of customer business, subject the Company to additional regulatory scrutiny, or expose the Company to civil litigation and possible financial liability, any of which could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.

The Company continually encounters technological change.

The financial services industry is continually undergoing rapid technological change with frequent introductions of new technology-driven products and services.  The effective use of technology increases efficiency and enables financial institutions to better serve customers and to reduce costs.  The Company’s future success depends, in part, upon its ability to address the needs of its customers by using technology to provide products and services that will satisfy customer demands, as well as to create additional efficiencies in the Company’s operations.  Many of the Company’s competitors have substantially greater resources to invest in technological improvements.  The Company may not be able to effectively implement new technology-driven products and services or be successful in marketing these products and services to its customers.  Failure to successfully keep pace with technological change affecting the financial services industry could have a material adverse impact on the Company’s business and, in turn, the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.

The Company is subject to claims and litigation pertaining to fiduciary responsibility.

From time-to-time, customers make claims and take legal action pertaining to the Company’s performance of its fiduciary responsibilities.  Whether customer claims and legal action related to the Company’s performance of its fiduciary responsibilities are founded or unfounded, if such claims and legal actions are not resolved in a manner favorable to the Company they may result in significant financial liability and/or adversely affect the market perception of the Company and its products and services as well as impact customer demand for those products and services.  Any financial liability or reputation damage could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, which, in turn, could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.

Severe weather, natural disasters, acts of war or terrorism and other external events could significantly impact the Company’s business.

Severe weather, natural disasters, acts of war or terrorism and other adverse external events could have a significant impact on the Company’s ability to conduct business.  Such events could affect the stability of the Company’s deposit base, impair the ability of borrowers to repay outstanding loans, impair the value of collateral securing loans, cause significant property damage, result in loss of revenue and/or cause the Company to incur additional expenses.  Severe weather or natural disasters, acts of war or terrorism or other adverse external events may occur in the future.  Although Management has established disaster recovery policies and procedures, the occurrence of any such event could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, which, in turn, could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.

Risks Associated with the Company’s Common Stock

The Company’s stock price can be volatile.

Stock price volatility may make it more difficult for you to resell your common stock when you want and at prices you find attractive.  The Company’s stock price can fluctuate significantly in response to a variety of factors including, among other things:

·             Actual or anticipated variations in quarterly results of operations.

·             Recommendations by securities analysts.

·             Operating and stock price performance of other companies that investors deem comparable to the Company.

·             News reports relating to trends, concerns and other issues in the financial services industry.

·             Perceptions in the marketplace regarding the Company and/or its competitors.

·             New technology used, or services offered, by competitors.

·             Significant acquisitions or business combinations, strategic partnerships, joint ventures or capital commitments by or involving the Company or its competitors.

·             Failure to integrate acquisitions or realize anticipated benefits from acquisitions.

·             Changes in government regulations.

·             Geopolitical conditions such as acts or threats of terrorism or military conflicts.

General market fluctuations, industry factors and general economic and political conditions and events, such as economic slowdowns or recessions, interest rate changes or credit loss trends, could also cause the Company’s stock price to decrease regardless of operating results.

The trading volume in the Company’s common stock is less than that of other larger financial services companies.

The Company’s common stock is listed for trading on the over-the-counter bulletin board; the trading volume in its common stock is less than that of other larger financial services companies.  A public trading market having the desired characteristics of depth, liquidity and orderliness depends on the presence in the marketplace of willing buyers and sellers of the Company’s common stock at any given time.  This presence depends on the individual decisions of investors and general economic and market conditions over which the Company has no control.  Given the lower trading volume of the Company’s common stock, significant sales of the Company’s common stock, or the expectation of these sales, could cause the Company’s stock price to fall.

An investment in the Company’s common stock is not an insured deposit.

The Company’s common stock is not a bank deposit and, therefore, is not insured against loss by the FDIC, any other deposit insurance fund or by any other public or private entity.  Investment in the Company’s common stock is inherently risky for the reasons described in this “Risk Factors” section and elsewhere in this report and is subject to the same market forces that affect the price of common stock in any company.  As a result, if you acquire the Company’s common stock, you may lose some or all of your investment.

The Company’s articles of incorporation and by-laws, as well as certain banking laws may have an anti-takeover effect.

Provisions of the Company’s articles of incorporation and by-laws, federal banking laws, including regulatory approval requirements, could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire the Company, even if doing so would be perceived to be beneficial to the Company’s shareholders.  The combination of these provisions effectively inhibits a non-negotiated merger or other business combination, which, in turn, could adversely affect the market price of the Company’s common stock.

Risks Associated with the Company’s Industry

Future governmental regulation and legislation could limit the Company’s future growth.

The Company is a registered bank holding company, and its subsidiary bank is a depository institution whose deposits are insured by the FDIC.  As a result, the Company is subject to various regulations and examinations by various regulatory authorities.  In general, statutes establish the corporate governance and eligible business activities for the Company, certain acquisition and merger restrictions, limitations on inter-company transactions such as loans and dividends, capital adequacy requirements, requirements for anti-money laundering programs and other compliance matters, among other regulations.  The Company is extensively regulated under federal and state banking laws and regulations that are intended primarily for the protection of depositors, federal deposit insurance funds and the banking system as a whole.  Compliance with these statutes

and regulations is important to its ability to engage in new activities and to consummate additional acquisitions.

In addition, the Company is subject to changes in federal and state tax laws as well as changes in banking and credit regulations, accounting principles and governmental economic and monetary policies.  The Company cannot predict whether any of these changes may adversely and materially affect it.  Federal and state banking regulators also possess broad powers to take supervisory actions as they deem appropriate.  These supervisory actions may result in higher capital requirements, higher insurance premiums and limitations on the Company’s activities that could have a material adverse effect on its business and profitability.  While these statutes are generally designed to minimize potential loss to depositors and the FDIC insurance funds, they do not eliminate risk, and compliance with such statutes increases the Company’s expense, requires Management’s attention and can be a disadvantage from a competitive standpoint with respect to non-regulated competitors.

The earnings of financial services companies are significantly affected by general business and economic conditions.

The Company’s operations and profitability are impacted by general business and economic conditions in the United States and abroad.  These conditions include short-term and long-term interest rates, inflation, money supply, political issues, legislative and regulatory changes, fluctuations in both debt and equity capital markets, broad trends in industry and finance, and the strength of the U.S. economy and the local economies in which the Company operates, all of which are beyond the Company’s control.  Deterioration in economic conditions could result in an increase in loan delinquencies and non-performing assets, decreases in loan collateral values and a decrease in demand for the Company’s products and services, among other things, any of which could have a material adverse impact on the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.

Financial services companies depend on the accuracy and completeness of information about customers and counterparties.

In deciding whether to extend credit or enter into other transactions, the Company may rely on information furnished by or on behalf of customers and counterparties, including financial statements, credit reports and other financial information.  The Company may also rely on representations of those customers, counterparties or other third parties, such as independent auditors, as to the accuracy and completeness of that information.  Reliance on inaccurate or misleading financial statements, credit reports or other financial information could have a material adverse impact on the Company’s business and, in turn, the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.

Consumers may decide not to use banks to complete their financial transactions.

Technology and other changes are allowing parties to complete financial transactions that historically have involved banks through alternative methods.  For example, consumers can now maintain funds that would have historically been held as bank deposits in brokerage accounts or mutual funds.  Consumers can also complete transactions such as paying bills and/or transferring funds directly without the assistance of banks.  The process of eliminating banks as intermediaries, known as “disintermediation,” could result in the loss of fee income, as well as the loss of customer deposits and the related income generated from those deposits.  The loss of these revenue streams and the lower cost deposits as a source of funds could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.

ITEM 1B:    UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None


Get Adobe Flash player