Kimball International, Inc. (KBAL) - Description of business

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Company Description
General As used herein, the term "Company" refers to Kimball International, Inc., the Registrant, and its subsidiaries unless the context indicates otherwise. The Company was incorporated in Indiana in 1939. The corporate headquarters is located at 1600 Royal Street, Jasper, Indiana. The Company provides a variety of products from its two business segments: the Furniture and Cabinets segment and the Electronic Contract Assemblies segment. The Furniture and Cabinets segment provides furniture for the office and hospitality industries, sold under the Company's family of brand names. The Furniture and Cabinets segment also provides engineering and manufacturing services which utilize common production and support capabilities on a contract basis to customers primarily in the residential furniture and cabinets industry. The Electronic Contract Assemblies segment provides engineering and manufacturing services which utilize common production and support capabilities to a variety of industries globally. Certain product lines, particularly in the Electronic Contract Assemblies segment, experience seasonality which affects sales revenue flow. Production occurs in Company-owned or leased facilities located in the United States, Mexico, Thailand, Poland, Ireland and the United Kingdom. Construction of a manufacturing facility in China is also substantially complete.  In the United States, the Company has facilities and showrooms in nine states and the District of Columbia.   Available Information We make available free of charge through our website, www.ir.kimball.com, our annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and all amendments to those reports as soon as reasonably practicable after such material is electronically filed with, or furnished to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).  All reports we file with the SEC are also available via the SEC website, www.sec.gov, or may be read and copied at the SEC Public Reference Room located at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549.  Information on the operation of the Public Reference Room may be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330.  The Company's Internet website and the information contained therein or incorporated therein are not intended to be incorporated into this Annual Report on Form 10-K.   Restructuring In February 2006, the Company approved a restructuring plan within the Electronic Contract Assemblies segment to exit a manufacturing facility located in Northern Indiana. As part of this restructuring plan, the production for select programs will be transferred to other locations within this segment. The building and land will be sold.  Operations at this facility are scheduled to cease in the Company's first quarter of fiscal year 2007. The plan includes employee transition costs, asset impairment costs, accelerated software amortization costs and other exit costs. The decision to exit this facility was a result of excess capacity in North America.In September 2005, the Company announced a restructuring plan to sharpen its focus on primary markets within the Furniture and Cabinets segment. Administrative, marketing and business development functions are being consolidated to better serve the segment's primary markets. To simplify and standardize business processes, a portion of the Company's Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software is being redesigned.  The anticipated expenses of the plan include accelerated amortization, employee severance and other consolidation costs. The ERP redesign efforts are expected to span approximately three years.In June 2005, the Company announced a restructuring plan to consolidate its Mexican contract furniture and cabinets operations into one facility located in Juarez, Mexico resulting in the closure of its manufacturing facility in Mexicali, Mexico. The plan included lease charges, severance and other employee costs, equipment relocation costs, asset impairment and other miscellaneous consolidation costs. The decision to consolidate the operations was a result of excess capacity. The consolidation activities were completed during fiscal year 2006. In December 2002, the Company's Board of Directors approved a restructuring plan comprised of incremental cost scaling actions to more closely align the Company's operating capacities and capabilities with reduced demand levels related to the prolonged nature of the global economic slowdown in many of the Company's markets and the resulting continuation of underutilized manufacturing capacity within both of the Company's segments. Overall scaling actions included the consolidation of capabilities and operations, selling and/or exiting redundant facilities, aligning personnel costs and adjusting assets associated with scaling actions to their current fair values. The final restructuring expenses pursuant to this plan were recorded in fiscal year 2005. In June 2001, the Company's Board of Directors approved a plan to restructure certain operations to more closely align the Company's capabilities and capacities with changing market requirements and economic conditions as well as position the Company with a more competitive cost structure vital for overall long-term success. All actions related to the June 2001 restructuring plan were completed in fiscal year 2003. Additional information regarding the Company's restructuring activities is located in "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in Item 7 and in Note 17 - Restructuring Expense of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.   Discontinued Operations During fiscal year 2006, the Company sold a forest products hardwood lumber business unit, a business unit which produced and sold fixed-wall furniture systems, and an operation that manufactured polyurethane and polyester molded components. All three business units were part of the Furniture and Cabinets segment.  During fiscal year 2005, the Company exited the branded residential furniture business which was part of the branded furniture product line within the Furniture and Cabinets segment. Also during fiscal year 2005, the Company exited a veneer slicing operation, which was part of the Furniture and Cabinets segment. The cessation of these non-core operations did not impact any of the remaining operations of the Company. The results of the above mentioned operations are reported as discontinued operations in the Company's Consolidated Financial Statements and all prior periods have been restated.  The discontinued operations are discussed in further detail in "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in Item 7 and in Note 18 - Discontinued Operations of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.   Acquisitions During fiscal year 2006, the Company acquired the Bridgend, Wales, UK manufacturing operations of Bayer Diagnostics Manufacturing Limited ("BDML") and its parent company, Bayer Healthcare, LLC, a member of the worldwide group of companies headed by Bayer AG. This acquisition will enable the Electronics Contract Assemblies segment of the Company to capitalize on growth opportunities in the medical market. The BDML workforce and their capabilities have added to the Electronics' segment package of value that is offered to medical customers. Also during fiscal year 2006, the Company acquired a printed circuit board assembly operation in Longford, Ireland from Magna Donnelly Electronics Longford Limited.  Both of these acquisitions emphasize the Company's strategic expansion of global capabilities and responsiveness in serving its customers.  The acquisitions are discussed in further detail in "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in Item 7 and in Note 2 - Acquisitions and Dispositions of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.   Sales by Segment Sales from continuing operations by segment, after elimination of intersegment sales, for each of the three years in the period ended June 30, 2006 were as follows: (Amounts in Thousands)        2006          2005         2004 Furniture and Cabinets $   645,621   $   612,579   $   613,048 Electronic Contract Assemblies 496,706   439,696   439,309 Unallocated Corporate 254   872   1,136      Total $1,142,581   $1,053,147   $1,053,493       Financial information by segment and geographic area for each of the three years in the period ended June 30, 2006 is included in Note 14 - Segment and Geographic Area Information of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements and is incorporated herein by reference. Segments  Furniture and Cabinets   Historical Overview Since 1950, the Company has produced wood furniture and cabinets. Included in this segment are sales of branded office and hospitality furniture. Furniture and Cabinet segment sales also include sales of contract private label products such as large-screen projection television cabinets and stands. The Company announced a plan in fiscal year 2006 to exit the contract private label product line and is currently working with its customers in executing this plan. The Company's trucking fleet and distribution centers provide services primarily to internal customers within this segment, and are also sold to unaffiliated customers. During fiscal year 2006, the Company sold a forest products hardwood lumber business unit, a business unit which produced and sold fixed-wall furniture systems, and an operation that manufactured polyurethane and polyester molded components for use in the recreational vehicle, signage and residential furniture industries. The results of these three operations are reported as discontinued operations in the Company's Consolidated Financial Statements and all prior periods have been restated. During fiscal year 2005, the Company exited the branded residential furniture business which was part of the branded furniture product line within this segment. Also during fiscal year 2005, the Company exited a veneer slicing operation. The results of the veneer and branded residential furniture operations are reported as discontinued operations in the Company's Consolidated Financial Statements and all prior periods have been restated. During fiscal year 2002, the Company sold its Boesendorfer piano subsidiary, which had originally been acquired in 1966. The Company was previously engaged in the manufacture and sales of a domestically produced piano product line since 1857 through a predecessor, W. W. Kimball Co., acquired in 1959, until cessation of this product line in 1996.     Locations Branded furniture as well as furniture and cabinets produced on a contract basis and related products, which comprise a majority of this segment, as of June 30, 2006 are produced at twelve plants; eight located in Indiana, two in Kentucky, and one each in Idaho and Mexico. As a result of the restructuring activities related to both the fiscal years 2001 and 2003 restructuring plans, ten manufacturing facilities not included above ceased operations; six in Indiana and one each in Kentucky, North Carolina, Florida and Mississippi. One Kentucky and two Indiana facilities were donated. Two Indiana facilities and the one Mississippi facility were sold and the leases on the Florida and North Carolina facilities expired. One facility in Indiana ceased operations and was converted to a distribution and warehouse facility in fiscal year 2002, which replaced a previously leased facility. The Company converted one idled Indiana manufacturing facility to house shared services such as engineering, finish development and sample production. During fiscal year 2006 the operations of a leased Tennessee plant were consolidated into an existing Indiana facility and the operations of a leased plant in Mexico were consolidated into the Company's other facility in Mexico. Also during fiscal year 2006, the Company sold two operations, one each in Pennsylvania and Indiana, as part of a plan to increase its focus on primary markets.During fiscal year 2006, three lumber warehousing facilities, five log yards, three sawmills, and three lumberyards located in Indiana, Tennessee, Virginia, and Kentucky were sold as the Company exited its forest products operations. A facility in Jasper, Indiana houses an Education Center for dealer and employee training, a Product Design and Research Center, and a Corporate Showroom for product display. Office space is leased in Dongguan, Guangdong, China to facilitate sourcing of product from Pacific Rim countries. In the United States, office furniture showrooms are maintained in eight cities. During fiscal year 2006 office furniture showrooms in Denver and San Francisco were exited.  An office furniture showroom in London, England was closed as a result of the restructuring plan announced in fiscal year 2003.   Marketing Channels Kimball Office and National brands of office furniture are marketed through Company salespersons to end users, office furniture dealers, wholesalers, rental companies and catalog houses throughout North America and on international basis. Hospitality furniture is marketed to end users using independent manufacturers' representatives. Prior to the announced exit, contract private label products were generally marketed to end users through Company business development managers and, to a lesser extent, independent representatives.   Major Competitive Factors The Company's branded furniture is sold in the office furniture and hospitality furniture industries. These industries have similar major competitive factors which include price in relation to quality and appearance, the utility of the product, supplier lead time, reliability of on-time delivery, and the ability to respond to requests for special and non-standard products. Certain industries are more price sensitive than others, but all expect on-time, damage-free delivery. The Company maintains sufficient finished goods inventories to be able to offer prompt shipment of certain lines of Kimball Office and National office furniture as well as most of the Company's own lines of hospitality furniture. The Company also produces contract hospitality furniture to customers' specifications and shipping timelines. Many office furniture products are shipped through the Company's delivery system, which the Company believes offers it the ability to reduce damage to product, enhance scheduling flexibility, and improve the capability for on-time deliveries.   Competitors There are numerous manufacturers of office and hospitality furniture competing within the marketplace, with a significant number of competitors offering similar products. The Company believes, however, that there are a limited number of relatively large manufacturers of wood office and hospitality furniture. In many instances wood office furniture competes in the market with metal office furniture. Based on available industry statistics, metal office furniture has a larger share of the total office furniture market. The Company's competition includes office furniture manufacturers such as Steelcase, Inc., Herman Miller, Inc., Knoll, Inc., Haworth, Inc. and HNI Corporation and hospitality furniture manufacturers such as American of Martinsville, Fleetwood Fine Furniture, Inc., Thomasville Furniture Industries, Inc. and Fairmont Designs.   Raw Material Availability Certain components used in the production of furniture and cabinets are manufactured internally within the segment, and are generally readily available, as are other raw materials used in the production of wood furniture and cabinets. With the exception of rolled steel, raw materials used in the manufacture of metal office furniture have been readily available in the global market. While we have been able to maintain an appropriate supply of rolled steel to meet demand, general supply limitations in the market are impacting our costs. Costs of other commodity materials have also increased. Certain fabricated seating components and wood frame assemblies as well as finished furniture products, which are generally readily available, are sourced on a global scale in an effort to provide a quality product at the lowest total cost.   Electronic Contract Assemblies   Historical Overview The Company entered the electronic manufacturing services (EMS) market in 1985 with knowledge acquired from the production of electronic organs, which were first produced in 1963. The Company's focus is on electronic assemblies that have high durability requirements such as automotive, medical, industrial and public safety applications. Electronics and electro-mechanical products (electronic assemblies) are sold globally on a contract basis and produced to customers' specifications. In addition to the manufacturing of electronic contract assemblies for high durability applications, the Company also provides value engineering services and supply chain management. Engineering design and support services, including new product introduction services, are provided to the manufacturing facilities within this segment by Kimball Electronics Engineering and Design Shared Services.  During fiscal year 2006 the Company acquired an operation in Wales, United Kingdom which currently provides manufacturing services for medial diagnostic systems such as assembling and packaging medical test strips and assembling and testing of electronic diagnostic testers. This facility is FDA certified and was acquired to support the Company's efforts to capitalize on growth opportunities in the medical market.  The Company also acquired a printed circuit board assembly operation in Longford, Ireland during fiscal year 2006.   Locations As of June 30, 2006 the Company's Electronic Contract Assemblies segment consists of eight manufacturing facilities with three located in Indiana and one each in Mexico, Thailand, Poland, Ireland and the United Kingdom. The Company is in the process of exiting one of the above mentioned Indiana facilities pursuant to a restructuring plan announced during fiscal year 2006 which was driven by excess North American capacity. The Ireland and United Kingdom facilities were acquired by the Company during fiscal year 2006. An additional manufacturing facility in Nanjing, China is also being constructed with operations expected to begin in the Autumn of 2006.  As part of the restructuring plan announced in the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2001, the Company decided to exit the business of providing DIE processing and assembly services to the European market and as a result the Company sold its manufacturing facility located in France during fiscal year 2003. Likewise, as part of the restructuring plan announced in the second quarter of fiscal year 2003, the Company decided to exit the domestic DIE processing business and sold its California manufacturing facility in the latter half of fiscal year 2003. The contract electronics manufacturing industry in general has been faced with excess capacity. The Company has not been immune to the economic slowdown and continually evaluates its operations as to the most optimum capacity and service levels by geographic region. Operations located outside of the United States continue to be an integral part of the Company's Electronic Contract Assemblies segment.  See Item 1A-Risk Factors for information regarding financial and operational risks related to the Company's international operations.   Marketing Channels Manufacturing and design services are marketed by the Company's business development team. Contract electronic assemblies are manufactured based on specific orders, generally resulting in a small amount of finished goods consisting primarily of goods awaiting shipment to specific customers.   Major Competitive Factors Key competitive factors in the EMS market are competitive pricing, quality and reliability, engineering design services, production flexibility, on-time delivery, customer lead time, test capability, and global presence. Growth in the EMS industry is created through the proliferation of electronic components in today's advanced products along with the continuing trend of original equipment manufacturers in the electronic industry to subcontract the assembly process to companies with a core competence in this area. The nature of the EMS industry is such that the start-up of new customers and new programs to replace expiring programs occurs frequently. New customer and program start-ups generally cause losses early in the life of a program, which are generally recovered as the program matures and becomes established. The segment continues to experience margin pressures related to an overall excess capacity position in the EMS industry and more specifically this segment's new program launches and diversification efforts. The continuing success of this segment is dependent upon its ability to replace expiring customers/programs with new customers/programs.   Competitors The EMS industry is very competitive as numerous manufacturers of contract electronic assemblies compete for business from existing and potential customers. The Company's competition includes EMS companies such as Benchmark Electronics, Inc., Jabil Circuit, Inc. and Plexus Corp. The Company does not have a significant share of the EMS market.   Raw Material Availability Raw materials utilized in the manufacture of contract electronic products are generally readily available from both domestic and foreign sources, although from time to time the industry experiences shortages of certain components due to supply and demand forces, combined with rapid product life cycles of certain components. Raw materials are normally acquired for specific customer orders and may or may not be interchangeable among products. Inherent risks associated with rapid technological changes within this contract industry are mitigated by procuring raw materials, for the most part, based on firm orders.   Customer Concentration While the total electronic assemblies market has broad applications, the Company's customers are concentrated in the automotive, industrial controls, and medical industries. Included in this segment are sales of electronic assemblies to TRW Automotive, Inc., a full-service automotive supplier, which accounted for approximately 27% of this segment's net sales in fiscal year 2006, compared to 30% in fiscal year 2005 and 37% in fiscal year 2004. Sales to TRW Automotive, Inc. accounted for approximately 12% of the Company's consolidated net sales in fiscal year 2006, compared to 12% and 15% in fiscal years 2005 and 2004, respectively. TRW Automotive, Inc. sells complete braking assemblies, in part manufactured by the Company, to several major automotive companies, most with multiple braking assembly programs that span multiple vehicle platforms, which partially mitigates the Company's exposure to this customer. The Company also supplies electronic power steering products to TRW Automotive, Inc. As a result of the acquisition of the Bridgend, Wales, UK manufacturing operations of Bayer Diagnostics Manufacturing Limited (BDML) in the Company's fourth quarter of fiscal year 2006, sales to Bayer AG entities under common control are also significant and accounted for approximately 13% of this segment's net sales in fiscal year 2006, compared to 4% in fiscal year 2005 and 6% in fiscal year 2004. Sales to Bayer AG companies accounted for approximately 6% of the Company's consolidated net sales in fiscal year 2006, compared to 2% in both fiscal years 2005 and 2004. Other Information  Backlog At June 30, 2006, the aggregate sales price of production pursuant to worldwide open orders, which may be canceled by the customer, were $224 million as compared to $189 million at June 30, 2005.

June 30, 2006

June 30, 2005 (Amounts in Millions) Furniture and Cabinets $   93     $  81     Electronic Contract Assemblies   131     108         Total Backlog of Continuing Operations $ 224     $ 189       Substantially all of the open orders as of June 30, 2006 are expected to be filled within the next fiscal year.  During the fiscal year ended June 30, 2006, the production planning process was standardized within the Electronic Contract Assemblies segment.  As a result of this process change, the open orders as of June 30, 2005 have been adjusted for consistency with the open orders reported as of June 30, 2006.  Open orders as of June 30, 2006 include open orders of acquisitions made during the fiscal year and open orders as of June 30, 2005 exclude open orders related to discontinued operations.  Open orders generally may not be indicative of future sales trends.   Research, Patents, and TrademarksResearch and development activities include the development of manufacturing processes, major process improvements, new product development, information technology initiatives and electronic and wood related technologies. Research and development costs were approximately as follows:      

  Year Ended June 30  

        2006

       2005

        2004 (Amounts in Millions) Research and Development Costs of Continuing Operations

      $14.9

      $17.7

      $16.1 The Company owns the Kimball (registered trademark) trademark, which it believes is significant to its office, electronic, and hospitality furniture businesses, and owns the following patents and trademarks which it believes are significant to its furniture business only: National (registered trademark), Cetra (registered trademark), Footprint (registered trademark), Traxx (patented and registered trademark), Interworks (registered trademark), Xsite (registered trademark), Definition (registered trademark), Skye (registered trademark), WaveWorks (registered trademark), Senator (trademark registration pending), President, Wish (trademark registration pending) and Prevail (registered trademark). The Company also owns certain patents and other trademarks and has certain other trademark and patent applications pending, which in the Company's opinion are not significant to its business.  Patents owned by the Company expire at various times depending on the patent's date of issuance.   Environment and Energy MattersThe Company's operations are subject to various foreign, federal, state and local laws and regulations with respect to environmental matters. The Company believes that it is in substantial compliance with present laws and regulations and that there are no material liabilities related to such items. The Company is dedicated to excellence, leadership and stewardship in matters of protecting the environment and communities in which the Company has operations.  Reinforcing the Company's commitment to the environment, two of the Company's showrooms have been designed under the guidelines of the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) for Commercial Interiors program.  The Company believes that continued compliance with foreign, federal, state and local laws and regulations which have been enacted relating to the protection of the environment will not have a material effect on its capital expenditures, earnings or competitive position. Management believes capital expenditures for environmental control equipment during the two fiscal years ending June 30, 2008, will not represent a material portion of total capital expenditures during those years. The Company's manufacturing operations require significant amounts of energy, including natural gas and oil. Federal and state statutes and regulations control the allocation of fuels available to the Company, but to date the Company has experienced no interruption of production due to such regulations. In its wood processing plants, a portion of energy requirements are satisfied internally by the use of the Company's own wood waste products.   Employees    June 30, 2006 June 30, 2005   United States  4,730     5,164    Foreign Countries 2,782     2,180       Total Full Time Employees of Continuing Operations 7,512     7,344      The Company has no collective bargaining agreements with respect to its domestic employees. All of the Company's foreign operations are subject to collective bargaining arrangements, many mandated by government regulation or customs of the particular countries. The Company believes that its employee relations are good.  Forward-Looking Statements This document may contain certain forward-looking statements. These are statements made by management, using their best business judgment based upon facts known at the time of the statements or reasonable estimates, about future results, plans, or future performance and business of the Company. Such statements involve risk, uncertainty, and their ultimate validity is affected by a number of factors, both specific and general. They should not be construed as a guarantee that such results or events will, in fact, occur or be realized. The statements may be identified by the use of words such as "believes", "anticipates", "expects", "intends", "projects", "estimates" and similar expressions. It is not possible to foresee or identify all factors that could cause actual results to differ from expected or historical results. Additional information regarding risk factors is available in " Item 1A - Risk Factors " of this report. The Company makes no commitment to update these factors or to revise any forward-looking statements for events or circumstances occurring after the statement is issued, except as required by law. At any time when the Company makes forward-looking statements, it desires to take advantage of the "safe harbor" which is afforded such statements under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 where factors could cause actual results to differ materially from forward-looking statements.   Item 1A - Risk Factors The following important risk factors, among others, could affect future results and events, causing results and events to differ materially from those expressed or implied in forward-looking statements made in this report and presented elsewhere by management from time to time. Such factors, among others, may have a material adverse effect on the Company's business, financial condition, and results of operations and should be carefully considered. It is not possible to predict or identify all such factors. Consequently, any such list should not be considered to be a complete statement of all the Company's potential risks or uncertainties. Because of these and other factors, past performance should not be considered an indication of future performance.Downturns in economic and market conditions could adversely impact demand for the Company's products and adversely affect operating results. Market demand for the Company's products, which impacts revenues and gross profit, is influenced by a variety of economic factors such as: general corporate profitability of the Company's end markets; new office construction and refurbishment rates; new hotel construction and refurbishment rates; automotive industry fluctuations, specifically variation in the performance and market share of U.S. based auto manufacturers; changes in the medical device industry; demand for end-user products which include electronic assembly components produced by the Company; excess capacity in the industries in which the Company competes; and changes in customer order patterns, including changes in product quantities, delays in orders or cancellation of orders. The Company must make decisions based on order volumes in order to achieve efficiency in manufacturing capacities.  These decisions include determining what level of additional business to accept, production schedules, component procurement commitments, and personnel requirements, among various other considerations.The Company must constantly monitor the changing economic landscape and may modify its strategic direction based upon the changing business environment. If the Company does not react quickly enough to the changes in market or economic conditions, it could result in lost customers, decreased market share and increased operating costs.The Company operates in a highly competitive environment and may not be able to compete successfully. The electronic manufacturing services industry is very competitive as numerous manufacturers compete globally for business from existing and potential customers. The office and hospitality furniture industries are also competitive due to numerous global manufacturers competing in the marketplace. The high level of competition in these industries impacts the Company's ability to implement price increases or, in some cases, even maintain prices, which could lower profit margins. The Company faces pricing pressures that could adversely affect the Company's financial position, results of operations or cash flows. The Company faces pricing pressures in both of its segments, especially the Electronic Contract Assemblies segment, as a result of intense competition, emerging products or over-capacity. While the Company works toward reducing costs to respond to pricing pressures, if the Company cannot achieve the proportionate reductions in costs, profit margins may suffer. Reduction of purchases by, or the loss of, one or more key customers could reduce revenues and profitability. Losses of key contract customers within specific industries or significant volume reductions from key contract customers are both risks. In addition, continuing success of the Company is dependent upon replacing expiring contract customers/programs with new customers/programs. One of our customers, TRW, Inc., accounted for approximately 12%, 12% and 15% of our consolidated net sales in fiscal years 2006, 2005 and 2004, respectively. As a result of the acquisition of the Bridgend, Wales, UK manufacturing operations of Bayer Diagnostics Manufacturing Limited in the Company's fourth quarter of fiscal year 2006, sales to Bayer are also significant and accounted for 17% of consolidated net sales in the fiscal year 2006 fourth quarter. Significant declines in the level of purchases by these or other key customers, or the loss of a significant number of customers, could have a material adverse effect on business. In addition, the nature of the contract electronics manufacturing industry is such that the start-up of new customers and new programs to replace expiring programs occurs frequently, and new customer and program start-ups generally cause losses early in the life of a program. Furthermore, the Company is exposed to the credit risk of customers, including risk of bankruptcy, and is subject to losses from accounts receivable.The Company's future operating results depend on the ability to purchase a sufficient amount of materials, parts and components at competitive prices. The Company depends on suppliers to provide timely delivery of materials, parts and components for use in the Company's products. Maintaining strong relationships with key suppliers of components critical to the manufacturing process is essential. If suppliers fail to meet commitments to the Company in terms of price, delivery or quality, it could interrupt the Company's operations and negatively impact the Company's ability to meet commitments to customers.The Company could be adversely affected by increased commodity costs or availability of raw materials. Price increases of commodity components could have an adverse impact on profitability if the Company cannot offset such increases by price increases to customers or other cost reductions. In recent years, the Company has experienced increases in the prices of key commodities used in Furniture and Cabinets segment products, such as steel and wood composite sheet stock.  Raw materials utilized by the Company are generally available, but future availability is unknown and could impact the Company's ability to meet customer order requirements.The Company could be impacted by manufacturing inefficiencies at certain locations. At times the Company may experience labor or other manufacturing inefficiencies due to items such as new product introductions, a new operating system or turnover in personnel. Manufacturing inefficiencies could have an adverse impact on the Company's financial position, results of operations or cash flows.A change in the Company's sales mix among various products could have a negative impact on the gross profit margin. Changes in product sales mix could negatively impact the gross margin of the Company as margins of different products vary. The Company strives to improve the margins of all products, but certain products have lower margins in order to price the product competitively or in connection with the start-up of a new program. An increase in the proportion of sales of product with lower margins could have an adverse impact on the Company's financial position, results of operations or cash flows. The Company's restructuring efforts may not be successful. During fiscal year 2006 the Company announced restructuring activities that included exiting a manufacturing facility in the Electronic Contract Assemblies segment and tightening its focus within the Furniture and Cabinets segment to better serve primary markets. As part of the Furniture and Cabinets segment activities, the Company sold a forest products hardwood lumber operation, a business which produced and sold fixed-wall furniture systems and a business that manufactured polyurethane and polyester molded components. In addition, the plan includes the consolidation of administrative, marketing and business development functions within the Furniture and Cabinets segment, which is not yet complete. While the Company believes that these actions will result in a more competitive position and should also reduce certain costs, there are inherent risks in making these types of organizational changes. The Company continually evaluates its manufacturing capabilities and capacities in relation to current and anticipated market conditions. The success of restructuring initiatives is dependent on several factors and may not be accomplished as quickly or effectively as anticipated. Acquisitions by their nature may present risks to the Company. The Company's strategy to grow may occur through both organic growth and acquisitions. Acquisitions involve many risks, including: difficulties in identifying suitable acquisition candidates and in negotiating and consummating acquisitions on terms attractive to the Company; difficulties in the assimilation of the operations of the acquired company; the diversion of resources, including diverting management's attention from current operations; risks of entering new geographic or product markets in which the Company has limited or no direct prior experience; the potential loss of key employees of the acquired company; the potential incurrence of indebtedness to fund the acquisition; the potential issuance of common stock for some or all of the purchase price, which could dilute ownership interests of the Company's current shareholders; the acquired business may not achieve anticipated revenues, earnings, cash flow or market share; excess capacity; the assumption of undisclosed liabilities; and dilution of earnings. The above risks could have a material adverse effect on the Company's financial position, results of operations or cash flows. Start-up operations could present risks to the Company's current operations. The Company is committed to growing its business, and therefore from time to time the Company may determine that it would be in its best interests to start up a new operation. Start-up operations involve a number of risks and uncertainties, such as funding the capital expenditures related to the start-up operation, developing a management team for the new operation, diversion of management focus away from current operations, and creation of excess capacity. Any of these risks could have a material adverse effect on the Company's financial position, results of operations or cash flows.Our international operations involve financial and operational risks. The Company has operations outside the United States, primarily in China, Thailand, Poland, Ireland, the United Kingdom and Mexico. The Company's international operations are subject to a number of risks, which may include the following: economic and political instability; changes in foreign regulatory requirements and laws; tariffs and other trade barriers; potentially adverse tax consequences; and foreign labor practices. These risks could have an adverse effect on the Company's financial position, results of operations or cash flows. In addition, fluctuations in exchange rates could impact our operating results. The Company's risk management strategy includes the use of derivative financial instruments to hedge certain foreign currency exposures. Any hedging techniques the Company implements in the future contain risks and may not be entirely effective. Exchange rate fluctuations could also make the Company's products more expensive than competitor's products not subject to these fluctuations, which could adversely affect the Company's revenues and profitability in international markets. If the Company's efforts to introduce new products are not successful, this could limit sales growth or cause sales to decline. The Electronic Contact Assemblies segment depends on industries that utilize technologically advanced electronics components which often have short life cycles. The Company must continue to invest in advanced equipment and product development to remain competitive in this area. The Furniture and Cabinets segment regularly introduces new products to keep pace with workplace trends and evolving regulatory and industry requirements, including environmental, health, safety and similar standards for the workplace and for product performance. The introduction of new products requires the coordination of the design, manufacturing and marketing of such products. The design and engineering of certain new products can take up to two years or more and further time may be required to achieve customer acceptance. Accordingly, the launch of any particular product may be delayed or be less successful than originally anticipated by the Company. Difficulties or delays in introducing new products or lack of customer acceptance of new products could limit sales growth or cause sales to decline. If customers do not perceive the Company's products to be of high quality, the Company's brand and name recognition could suffer. The Company believes that establishing and maintaining brand and name recognition is critical to business. Promotion and enhancement of the Company's brands will depend on the effectiveness of marketing and advertising efforts and on successfully providing high quality products and superior services. If customers do not perceive our products and services to be of high quality, the Company's brand and name recognition could suffer, which could have a material adverse effect on the Company's business.A loss of independent manufacturing representatives, dealers, or other sales channels could lead to a decline in sales of the Company's Furniture and Cabinets segment products. The Company's office furniture is marketed primarily through Company salespersons to end users, office furniture dealers, wholesalers, rental companies and catalog houses. The Company's hospitality furniture is marketed to end users using independent manufacturing representatives. A significant loss within any of these sales channels could result in a sales decline and thus have an adverse impact on the Company's financial position, results of operations or cash flows.The Company must effectively manage working capital. The Company has historically had positive operating cash flows, but effective management of working capital is key to continuing that trend. The Company closely monitors inventory and receivable efficiencies and continuously strives to improve these measures of working capital but customer financial difficulties or Company manufacturing delays could cause deteriorating working capital trends.The Company's assets could become impaired. As business conditions change, the Company must continually evaluate and work toward the optimum asset base. It is possible that certain assets could be impaired at some point in the future depending on changing business conditions. If assets of the Company become impaired the result could be an adverse impact on the Company's financial position, results of operations or cash flows.There are inherent uncertainties involved in estimates, judgments and assumptions used in the preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States (U.S. GAAP). Any changes in estimates, judgments and assumptions could have a material adverse effect on the Company's financial position, results of operations or cash flows. The Company's financial statements filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission are prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP and the preparation of such financial statements includes making estimates, judgments and assumptions that affect reported amounts of assets, liabilities and related reserves, revenues, expenses, and income. Estimates are inherently subject to change in the future and such changes could result in corresponding changes to the amounts of assets, liabilities, income or expenses and likewise could have an adverse effect on the Company's financial position and results of operations.The Company could be subject to additional tax liabilities. The Company is subject to income taxes as well as non-income based taxes, in both the United States and various foreign jurisdictions. Judgment is required in determining the worldwide provision for income taxes and other tax liabilities. Future events could change management's assessment. The Company operates within multiple taxing jurisdictions and is subject to tax audits in these jurisdictions. These audits can involve complex issues, which may require an extended period of time to resolve. The Company has also made assumptions about the realization of deferred tax assets. Changes in these assumptions could result in a valuation allowance for these assets. Final determination of tax audits or tax disputes may be different from what is currently reflected by the Company's income tax provisions and accruals. A failure to successfully implement information technology solutions could adversely affect the Company. The Company's business depends on effective information technology systems. Information systems require an ongoing commitment of significant resources to maintain and enhance existing systems and develop new systems in order to keep pace with changes in information processing technology and evolving industry standards. Implementation delays or poor execution of information technology systems could disrupt the Company's operations and increase costs.An inability to protect the Company's intellectual property could have a significant impact on business. The Company attempts to protect its intellectual property rights, both in the United States and in foreign countries, through a combination of patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret laws, as well as licensing agreements and third-party nondisclosure and assignment agreements. Because of the differences in foreign laws concerning proprietary rights, the Company's intellectual property rights do not generally receive the same degree of protection in foreign countries as they do in the United States, and therefore in some parts of the world the Company has limited protections, if any, for its intellectual property. Competing effectively depends, to a significant extent, on maintaining the proprietary nature of the Company's intellectual property. The degree of protection offered by the claims of the various patents, trademarks and service marks may not be broad enough to provide significant proprietary protection or competitive advantages to the Company, and patents, trademarks or service marks may not be issued on pending or contemplated applications. In addition, not all of the Company's products are covered by patents. It is also possible that the Company's patents, trademarks and service marks may be challenged, invalidated, cancelled, narrowed or circumvented.A third party could claim that the Company has infringed on their intellectual property rights. The Company could be notified of a claim regarding intellectual property rights which could lead to the Company spending time and money to defend or address the claim. Even if the claim is without merit, it could result in substantial costs and diversion of resources.The Company's insurance may not adequately protect the Company from liabilities related to product defects. The Company maintains product liability and other insurance coverage that the Company believes to be generally in accordance with industry practices. However, our insurance coverage may not be adequate to protect the Company fully against substantial claims and costs that may arise from liabilities related to product defects, particularly if the Company has a large number of defective products.The Company is subject to extensive environmental regulation and significant potential environmental liabilities. The past and present operation and ownership by the Company of manufacturing plants and real property are subject to extensive and changing federal, state, local and foreign environmental laws and regulations, including those relating to discharges in air, water and land, the handling and disposal of solid and hazardous waste and the remediation of contamination associated with releases of hazardous substances. The Company cannot predict what environmental legislation or regulations will be enacted in the future, how existing or future laws or regulations will be administered or interpreted or what environmental conditions may be found to exist. Compliance with more stringent laws or regulations, or stricter interpretation of existing laws, may require additional expenditures by the Company, some of which could be material. In addition, any investigations or remedial efforts relating to environmental matters could involve material costs or otherwise result in material liabilities.The Company's failure to retain the existing management team and continue to attract qualified personnel could adversely affect the Company's business. The Company's strategy requires continuous training, motivating, and development of employees and it strives to attract, motivate and retain qualified managerial personnel. Competition for these types of personnel is intense.  Failure to retain and attract these types of personnel could adversely affect the Company's business.Turnover in personnel could cause manufacturing inefficiencies. The demand for manufacturing labor in certain geographic areas makes it difficult to retain experienced production employees. Turnover could result in additional training and inefficiencies that could impact the Company's operating results. The Company cannot ensure that it will be successful in the retention of these employees. Natural disasters or other catastrophic events may impact the Company's production schedules and, in turn, negatively impact profitability. Natural disasters or other catastrophic events, including severe weather, terrorist attacks, power interruptions and fires, could disrupt operations and likewise the ability to produce or deliver the Company's products.  The Company's manufacturing operations require significant amounts of energy, including natural gas and oil, and governmental regulations control the allocation of such fuels to the Company.  In the event the Company experiences a temporary or permanent interruption in its ability to produce or deliver product, revenues could be reduced and business could be materially adversely affected. In addition, catastrophic events, or the threat thereof, can adversely affect U.S. and world economies, and could result in delayed or lost sales of the Company's products. In addition, any continuing disruption in the Company's computer system could adversely affect the ability to receive and process customer orders, manufacture products and ship products on a timely basis, and could adversely affect relations with customers, potentially resulting in reduction in orders from customers or loss of customers. The Company maintains insurance to help protect the Company from costs relating to these matters but such may not be sufficient or paid in a timely manner to the Company in the event of such an interruption.The requirements of being a public company may strain the Company's resources and distract management. The Company is subject to the reporting requirements of federal securities laws, including the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Among other requirements, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires that the Company maintain effective disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting. The Company has, and expects to continue to, expend significant management time and resources documenting and testing our internal control over financial reporting. While management's evaluation as of June 30, 2006 resulted in the conclusion that the Company's internal control over financial reporting was effective as of that date, the Company cannot predict the outcome of testing in future periods. If the Company concludes in future periods that its internal control over financial reporting is not effective, or if its independent registered public accounting firm is not able to render the required attestations, it could result in lost investor confidence in the accuracy, reliability and completeness of the Company's financial reports.The market price of the Company's common stock may experience substantial fluctuations for reasons over which the Company has little control. The market price of common stock could fluctuate substantially based on a variety of factors, including, among others: actual or anticipated fluctuations in operating results; announcements concerning the Company, competitors or industry; overall volatility of the stock market; changes in government regulations; changes in the financial estimates of securities analysts or investors regarding the Company, the industry or competitors; and general market or economic conditions. Furthermore, stock prices for many companies fluctuate widely for reasons that may be unrelated to their operating results. These fluctuations, coupled with changes in results of operations and general economic, political and market conditions, may adversely affect the market price of the Company's common stock.   Item 1B - Unresolved Staff Comments None.   I

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