Radiation Therapy Svcs, Inc (RTSX) - Description of business


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Company Description
We are a provider of radiation therapy services to cancer patients. We own, operate and manage treatment centers focused principally on providing comprehensive radiation treatment alternatives ranging from conventional external beam radiation to newer, technologically-advanced options. We believe we are the largest company in the United States focused principally on providing radiation therapy. We opened our first radiation treatment center in 1983 and as of December 31, 2006, we provided radiation therapy in 66 freestanding and 10 hospital-based treatment centers. In 2006 we acquired 11 treatment centers including 7 in Southeastern Michigan. Our treatment centers are clustered into 24 local markets in 15 states, including Alabama, Arizona, California, Delaware, Florida, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island and West Virginia. In our 24 years of operation, we have developed a standardized operating model that enables our treatment centers to deliver high-quality, cost-effective patient care. We have a highly experienced management team and a number of our senior radiation oncologists are nationally recognized by the American College of Radiation Oncology for excellence and leadership in the field of radiation oncology. We also have affiliations with physicians specializing in other areas including gynecological and surgical oncology and urology in a limited number of our markets to strengthen our clinical working relationships.

We completed our initial public offering in June 2004. Our principal executive office is located at 2234 Colonial Boulevard, Fort Myers, Florida and our telephone number is (239) 931-7275. We conduct much of our business under the name of our wholly-owned subsidiary, 21 st Century Oncology, Inc. Our corporate website is www.rtsx.com and we make available copies of our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission on our website under the heading “Investor Relations” as soon as reasonably practicable after their filing. Our filings are also available on the Securities and Exchange Commission’s EDGAR database at www.sec.gov .

Industry Overview

Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, exceeded only by heart disease. In 2007, the American Cancer Society estimates there will be 1.5 million new cancer cases diagnosed in the United States and that cancer will account for one in every four deaths.

Treatment Options. There are many types of cancer, each of which is unique in how it grows and how it responds to treatment. A physician may choose which treatment or combination of treatments is most appropriate. Individuals diagnosed with cancer have four general treatment options:

  •  

radiation therapy (treatment with radiation to eliminate cancer cells);   •  

surgery (to remove a tumor);   •  

chemotherapy (treatment with anticancer drugs); and   •  

biological therapy (treatment to stimulate or restore the ability of the immune system to fight infection and disease). We focus principally on radiation therapy, which may be used alone or in combination with surgery, chemotherapy or biological therapy.

Radiation Therapy. According to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, approximately 50% to 60% of patients diagnosed with cancer receive radiation therapy. Radiation therapy is used to treat the most common types of cancer, including prostate, breast, lung and colorectal cancer, and involves exposing the patient to an external or internal source of radiation. Radiation therapy can be used to cure cancer by destroying cancer cells and, when curing cancer is not possible, to shrink tumors and reduce pressure, pain and relieve other symptoms of the cancer to enhance a patient’s quality of life.

Radiation Therapy Technology. The radiation utilized by a radiation oncologist for external beam treatments is produced by a machine known as a linear accelerator. A normal course of external beam radiation therapy ranges from 20 to 40 total treatments, given daily over a four to eight week period. Recent research has produced new, advanced methods for performing radiation treatments. These advanced methods result in more effective treatments that minimize the harm to healthy tissues that surround the tumor and therefore result in fewer side effects.

Radiation Therapy Market. According to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, it is estimated that there are approximately 4,200 radiation oncologists in the United States and over 2,200 hospital and freestanding radiation therapy centers. We believe that growth in the radiation therapy market will be driven by the following trends:

  •  

aging of the population in the United States, as 77% of all cancers are diagnosed in people over age 55;   •  

earlier detection and diagnosis of cancer;   •  

increased knowledge of and demand for advanced treatments by patients;   •  

growing utilization of advanced treatment technologies; and   •  

discovery of new and innovative means of delivering radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. We believe most of our competitors are not in a position to take full advantage of the opportunities within the market due to barriers to entry, such as significant capital requirements, limited size of operations, lack of depth in important areas such as technology, limited number and experience of physicians, availability of resources and lack of management experience.

Our Operating Strategy

Our goal is to provide cancer patients with radiation therapy treatments to maximize clinical outcomes. We focus principally on providing a broad spectrum of radiation therapy in both a patient-friendly environment and cost-effective manner. Our model is designed to maximize our relationships with patients and referring physicians, as well as attract and retain radiation oncologists. We believe that our operating strategy enables us to maximize patient service, quality of care and financial performance. The key elements of our operating strategy are to:

Emphasize Patient Service. We focus on providing our patients with an environment that minimizes the stress and uncertainty of being diagnosed with and treated for cancer. Our goal is to see patients within 24 hours of a referral and begin treatment as soon as possible thereafter. Our radiation oncologist discusses the proposed treatment, the possible side effects and the expected results of treatment with the patient and is available to respond to questions or concerns at any time. Other services we provide include nutritional counseling and assistance with reimbursement from third-party payers. We believe that our focus on patient service enhances the quality of care provided and differentiates us from other radiation therapy providers.

Provide Advanced Radiation Treatment Alternatives. Within our local markets, we are a leader in providing the most advanced radiation therapy alternatives. The advanced radiation treatment alternatives we provide are designed to deliver more effective radiation directly to the tumor while minimizing harm to surrounding tissues and therefore reducing side effects. We have directly benefited from the increasing awareness of cancer patients to these advanced radiation treatment alternatives.

Establish and Maintain Strong Clinical Relationships with Referring Physicians. Our team of radiation oncologists seeks to develop and maintain strong working clinical relationships with referring physicians by:

  •  

establishing a presence in the medical community and receiving referrals for radiation therapy based on our reputation for providing a high standard of quality patient care;   •  

providing excellent patient service and involving the referring physician in the care of the patient;   •  

educating our existing and potential referring physicians on new methods of radiation therapy; and   •  

strengthening clinical relationships by fully integrating with key physicians through group practices in selected markets. Recruit and Retain Leading Radiation Oncologists. We recruit radiation oncologists with excellent academic and clinical backgrounds who we believe have potential for professional growth. Our more senior oncologists are members of numerous professional organizations and have developed national reputations for excellence. We attract and retain radiation oncologists by:

  •  

offering them the opportunity to join an established team of leaders in the field of radiation oncology;   •  

providing them greater access to advanced technologies;   •  

offering them the opportunity to develop expertise in advanced treatment procedures;   •  

enabling them to conduct research and encouraging them to publish their results; and   •  

providing them with the opportunity to earn above the national average compensation for radiation oncologists. Cluster Our Treatment Centers In Local Markets. We cluster treatment centers in our local markets, which enables us to offer our patients a wide array of radiation therapy services in a cost-effective manner. By concentrating our treatment centers within a given geography, we are able to leverage our investment in advanced treatment technologies and our clinical and operational expertise across a larger patient population. Treatment centers in each of our clusters also share support services, such as physics, which leads to lower operating costs per treatment center. We are also able to better leverage our relationships with managed care payers due to the number of patients treated within our local markets.

Continually Enhance Operational Efficiencies. During our 24 years of operations, we have developed a standardized operating model that enables our treatment centers to cost-effectively deliver high-quality patient care. We continue to enhance our operating performance through the use of established protocols and procedures in our clinical operations. Furthermore, we have a centralized approach to business functions such as accounting, administration, billing, collection, marketing and purchasing, which we believe results in significant economies of scale and operating efficiencies.

Our Growth Strategy

Our growth strategy is to further increase our market share within our established local markets and selectively expand into new local markets. The key elements of our growth strategy are to:

Increase Revenue and Profitability of Our Existing Treatment Centers

We plan to increase revenue and profitability at our treatment centers within established local markets by:

  •  

increasing clinical referrals from physicians;   •  

expanding our offering of advanced treatment services;   •  

affiliating with physicians specializing in other areas including gynecological and surgical oncology and urology;   •  

adding additional radiation oncologists; and   •  

entering into additional payer relationships. Develop New Treatment Centers Within Our Existing Local markets

We plan to develop treatment centers to expand our existing local markets. We have experience in the design and construction of radiation treatment centers, having developed 22 treatment centers located in California, Florida, Maryland, Nevada and Rhode Island. Our newly-developed treatment centers typically achieve positive cash flow within six to twelve months after opening.

Selectively Enter New Local Markets

We plan to selectively expand into new local markets through acquisition, new treatment center development and strategic alliances and joint ventures. We evaluate potential expansion into new local markets based on:

  •  

demographic characteristics, including the number and concentration of Medicare recipients, population trends and historical and projected patient population growth and radiation treatment volumes;   •  

the extent to which we may have any pre-existing relationships with physicians or hospitals;   •  

the current competitive landscape of existing freestanding or hospital-based radiation treatment centers;   •  

the payer environment; and   •  

the regulatory environment. Expand Through Acquisitions. We plan to enter new local markets through the acquisition of established treatment centers that provide us the opportunity to leverage our current infrastructure. We seek to acquire treatment centers with leading radiation oncologists, strong clinical referral sources and substantial prospects for growth. We believe that significant opportunity exists to add value to acquired treatment centers by providing advanced radiation therapy technology and services and by implementing our proven operating model, which includes our standardized operating systems. In 2006 we entered 2 new local markets and we acquired 11 treatment centers. We have entered 12 local markets through acquisitions and have acquired 44 treatment centers to date.

Expand Through New Treatment Center Development. Where desirable, we plan to enter new local markets by internally developing new radiation treatment centers. To date, we have established 22 treatment centers in 9 local markets located in California, Florida, Maryland, Nevada and Rhode Island by internally developing new radiation treatment centers. Although we did not internally develop any new treatment centers in 2006, we currently plan to develop new treatment centers in our new local markets in Palm Springs, California and Scottsdale, Arizona, as well as add centers to our existing markets in southwest Florida.

Expand Through Strategic Alliances and Joint Ventures. We also plan to enter new local markets through strategic alliances and joint ventures. To date, we have entered 3 local markets through strategic alliances. These strategic alliances and joint ventures vary by market and can include the provision of administrative services, technology services and professional services or any combination thereof. To date, we have established these arrangements primarily with hospitals seeking our expertise in providing high-quality, cost-effective radiation therapy. Our desire and ability to enter into strategic alliances and joint venture arrangements depends on the regulatory and competitive environment and other economic factors. We have experience in effectively structuring these arrangements in a manner designed to meet the needs of multiple constituencies, including the physicians, the hospitals and regulatory authorities. Strategic alliances and joint ventures provide us with alternative methods to enter attractive new markets.

Expand Through Affiliations with Other Oncologists and Specialists. Healthcare is delivered locally, and in certain local markets, it may be advantageous to fully integrate with key physicians with medical specialties other than radiation oncology. As the practice of oncology and radiation oncology has become increasingly sophisticated, there has been a need to integrate other medical specialties in our operations. High precision radiation therapy requires close cooperation with other physicians, often from the surgical fields, to be able to target and treat tumors. In these instances, we believe we can further strengthen both our clinical working relationships and our standing in the local oncology field. We currently operate as a group practice in a limited number of our markets, principally with other oncologists, including gynecological and surgical oncologists, and, beginning in December 2005, in one local market with urologists. We plan to continue to seek affiliations with physicians having specialties other than radiation oncology where desirable.

Operations

We have 24 years of experience operating radiation treatment centers. We have developed an integrated operating model, which is comprised of the following key elements:

Treatment Center Operations. Our treatment centers are designed specifically to deliver high-quality radiation therapy in a patient-friendly environment. A treatment center typically has one or two linear accelerators, with additional rooms for simulators, computed tomography (CT) scans, physician offices, film processing and physics functions. In addition, treatment centers include a patient waiting room, dressing rooms, exam rooms and hospitality rooms, all of which are designed to minimize patient stress.

Cancer patients referred to one of our radiation oncologists are provided with an initial consultation, which includes an evaluation of the patient’s condition to determine if radiation therapy is appropriate, followed by a discussion of the effects of the therapy. If radiation therapy is selected as a method of treatment, the medical staff engages in clinical treatment planning. Clinical treatment planning utilizes x-rays, CT imaging, ultrasound, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and, in many cases, advanced computerized 3-D conformal imaging programs, in order to locate the tumor, determine the best treatment modality and the treatment’s optimal radiation dosage, and select the appropriate treatment regimen.

Our radiation treatment centers typically range from 5,000 to 12,000 square feet, have a radiation oncologist and a staff ranging between 10 and 25 people, depending on treatment center capacity and patient volume. The typical treatment center staff includes: radiation therapists, who deliver the radiation therapy, medical assistants or medical technicians, an office financial manager, receptionist, transcriptionist, block cutter, file clerk and van driver. In markets where we have more than one treatment center, we can more efficiently provide certain specialists to each treatment center, such as physicists, dosimetrists and engineers who service the treatment centers within that local market.

Standardized Operating Procedures. We have developed standardized operating procedures for our treatment centers in order to ensure that our professionals are able to operate uniformly and efficiently. Our manuals, policies and procedures are refined and modified as needed to increase productivity and efficiency and to provide for the safety of our employees and patients. We believe that our standard operating procedures facilitate the interaction of physicians, physicists, dosimetrists and radiation therapists and permit the interchange of employees among our treatment centers. In addition, standardized procedures facilitate the training of new employees.

Coding and Billing. Coding involves the translation of data from a patient’s medical chart to our billing system for submission to third-party payers. Our treatment centers provide radiation therapy services under approximately 60 different professional and technical codes, which determine reimbursement. Our Medical Director along with our certified professional coders work together to establish coding and billing rules and procedures to be utilized at our radiation treatment centers providing consistency across centers. In each radiation treatment center, our office financial manager is in charge of executing these rules and procedures with the trained personnel located at each treatment center. To provide an external check on the integrity of the coding process, we have retained the services of a third-party consultant to review and assess our coding procedures and processes on a periodic basis. Billing and collection functions are centrally performed by a staff at our executive offices.

Management Information Systems. We utilize centralized management information systems to closely monitor data related to each treatment center’s operations and financial performance. Our management information systems are used to track patient data, physician productivity and coding, as well as billing functions. Our management information systems also provide monthly budget analyses, financial comparisons to prior periods and comparisons among treatment centers, thus enabling management to evaluate the individual and collective performance of our treatment centers. We developed a proprietary image and text retrieval system referred to as the Oncology Wide-Area Network, which facilitates the storage and review of patient medical charts and films. We periodically review our management information systems for possible refinements and upgrading. Our management information systems personnel install and maintain our system hardware, develop and maintain specialized software and are able to integrate the systems of the practices we acquire.

Engineering and Physics Departments. We have established engineering and physics departments which implement standardized procedures for the acquisition, installation, calibration, use, maintenance and replacement of our linear accelerators, simulators and related equipment, as well as to the overall operation of our treatment centers. Our engineers perform preventive maintenance, repairs and installations of our linear accelerators. This enables our treatment centers to maximize equipment productivity and to minimize downtime. In addition, the engineering department maintains a warehouse of linear accelerator parts in order to provide equipment backup. Our physicists monitor and test the accuracy and integrity of each of our linear accelerators on a regular basis to ensure the safety and effectiveness of patient treatment. This testing also helps ensure that the linear accelerators are uniformly and properly calibrated.

Total Quality Management Program. We strive to achieve total quality management throughout our organization. Our treatment centers, either directly or in cooperation with the appropriate professional corporation or hospital, have a standardized total quality management program consisting of programs to monitor the design of the individual treatment of the patient via the evaluation of charts by radiation oncologists, physicists, dosimetrists and radiation therapists and for the ongoing validation of radiation therapy equipment. Each of our new radiation oncologists is assigned to a senior radiation oncologist who reviews each patient’s course of treatment through the patient’s medical chart using our Oncology Wide-Area Network. Furthermore, the data in our patient database is used to evaluate patient outcomes and to modify treatment patterns as necessary to improve patient care. We also utilize patient questionnaires to monitor patient satisfaction with the radiation therapy they receive.

Clinical Research. We believe that a well-managed clinical research program enhances the reputation of our radiation oncologists and our ability to recruit new radiation oncologists. Our treatment centers participate in national cooperative group trials and we have a full-time, in-house research staff to assure compliance with such trials and to perform related outcome analyses. We maintain a proprietary database of information on over 77,000 patients. The data collected includes tumor characteristics such as stage, histology and grade, radiation treatment parameters, other treatments delivered, complications and information on disease recurrences. In addition, follow-up data on disease status and patient survival rates are collected. This data can be used by the radiation oncologists to conduct research and improve patient care. We also assist the radiation oncologists with research in the form of outcome studies. These studies often are presented at international conferences and published in trade journals. To date, our radiation oncologists have published more than 215 articles in peer reviewed journals and related periodicals.

School of Radiation Therapy. In 1989, we founded The Radiation Therapy School for Radiation Therapy Technology, which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology. The school trains individuals to become radiation therapists. Upon graduation, students become eligible to take the national registry examination administered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. Radiation therapists are responsible for administering treatments prescribed by radiation oncologists and monitoring patients while under treatment. Since opening in 1989, the school has produced 97 graduates, 49 of whom are currently employed by us.

Recognizing a growing need for individuals trained in treatment planning, we founded the School for Medical Dosimetry in 2005. Currently, two senior and four junior students are enrolled in this program. Among other duties, the medical dosimetrists, under the supervision of the medical physicist, are responsible for developing an appropriate treatment plan according to the radiation oncologist’s prescribed dose for each patient. Upon graduation, these students are eligible to sit for the certifying examination administered by the Medical Dosimetry Certification Board.

Privacy of Medical Information. We focus on being compliant with regulations under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, or HIPAA, regarding privacy, security and transmission of health information. We have implemented such regulations into our existing systems, standards and policies to ensure compliance.

Compliance Program. We have a compliance program that is consistent with guidelines issued by the Office of Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services. As part of this compliance program, we adopted a code of ethics and have a full-time compliance officer at the corporate level. Our program includes an anonymous hotline reporting system, compliance training programs, auditing and monitoring programs and a disciplinary system to enforce our code of ethics and other compliance policies. It also includes a process for screening all employees through applicable federal and state databases of sanctioned individuals. Auditing and monitoring activities include claims preparation and submission and also cover issues such as coding, billing, and financial arrangements with physicians. These areas are also the focus of our specialized training programs.

Service and Treatment Offerings

We believe our radiation treatment centers are distinguishable from those of many of our competitors because we are able to offer patients a full spectrum of radiation therapy alternatives, including conventional external beam radiation therapy and advanced services such as image guided radiation therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy, 3-D conformal treatment planning, brachytherapy (including prostate seed implants and high dose rate remote after-loading of radioactive sources) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Radiation therapy is given in one of two ways: externally or internally, with some cancers treated with both internal and external radiation therapy. Most people undergoing radiation therapy for cancer are treated with external beam radiation therapy. Radiation therapy is used to treat the most common types of cancers including: prostate, breast, lung and colorectal.

External Beam Therapy. External beam radiation therapy involves exposing the patient to an external source of radiation through the use of a machine that directs radiation at the cancer. Machines utilized for external beam radiation therapy vary as some are better for treating cancers near the surface of the skin and others are better for treating cancers deeper in the body. A linear accelerator, the most common type of machine used for external beam radiation therapy, can create both high-energy and low-energy radiation. High-energy radiation is used to treat many types of cancer while low-energy radiation is used to treat some forms of skin cancer. A course of external beam radiation therapy normally ranges from 20 to 40 treatments. Treatments generally are given to a patient once each day with each session lasting for 10 to 20 minutes.

Internal Radiation Therapy. Internal radiation therapy also called brachytherapy, involves the placement of the radiation source inside the body. The source of the radiation (such as radioactive iodine) is sealed in a small holder called an implant and is introduced through the aid of thin wires or plastic tubes. Internal radiation therapy places the radiation source as close as possible to the cancer cells and delivers a higher dose of radiation in a shorter time than is possible with external beam treatments. Internal radiation therapy is typically used for cancers of the lung, esophagus, breast, uterus, thyroid, cervix and prostate. Implants may be removed after a short time or left in place permanently (with the radioactivity of the implant dissipating over a short time frame). Temporary implants may be either low-dose rate or high-dose rate. Low-dose rate implants are left in place for several days; high-dose rate implants are removed after a few minutes.

Since all of our treatment centers are clustered into local markets, our treatment centers are distinguished from those of many of our competitors by our ability to offer advanced radiation therapy services. Our advanced radiation treatment services include: image guided radiation therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy, 3-D conformal treatment planning, stereotactic radiosurgery and high-dose and low-dose rate brachytherapy.

The following table sets forth the forms of radiation therapy services and treatments that we offer:

Technologies:
  

Description:
Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT)    Enables radiation oncologists to utilize imaging at time of treatment to localize tumors and to accurately mirror the contour of a tumor from any angle. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)    Enables radiation oncologist to adjust the intensity of radiation levels delivered to more effectively treat certain cancers. Respiratory Gating    Enables radiation oncologist to treat cancers in the lung and upper abdomen with a noninvasive technique that accounts for respiratory motion allowing more accurate treatment. 3-D Conformal Treatment Planning    Enables radiation oncologist to utilize three dimensional images of tumors to more accurately and effectively plan radiation treatments. Stereotactic Radiosurgery    Enables delivery of very high doses of radiation treatment to certain lesions such as brain cancers. High-Dose Rate Remote Brachytherapy    Enables radiation oncologist to treat cancer by internally delivering higher doses of radiation directly to the cancer for a few minutes. Low-Dose Rate Brachytherapy    Enables radiation oncologist to treat cancer by internally delivering lower doses of radiation directly to the cancer over an extended period of time (e.g., prostate seed implants).

Image Guided Radiation Therapy. This technology provides the radiation oncologist with a mechanism to achieve increased precision in radiation therapy targeting. The technique utilizes high-resolution x-rays, CT scans or ultrasound imaging to pinpoint internal tumor sites before treatment and overcomes the limitations of conventional skin marking traditionally used for patient positioning. IGRT represents the convergence of medical imaging and high precision external beam therapy.

Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy. With IMRT, radiation can be focused at thousands of pinpoints and delivered by varying levels of beam intensity directly to a tumor. Because IMRT uses variable intensity beams, it can be used to treat tumors to higher doses and better spare normal tissue. IMRT technology can be programmed to actually wrap and angle beams of radiation around normal tissue and organs, protecting “good cells” as it destroys the tumor. As such, IMRT patients typically experience fewer side effects, which helps them to maintain their strength and lead more normal lifestyles during treatment.

Respiratory gating. This noninvasive technique allows radiation targeting and delivery to account for respiratory motion in the treatment of cancers in the lung and upper abdomen, protecting healthy structures while directing higher doses of radiation to the tumor. Respiratory gating matches radiation treatment to a patient’s respiratory pattern. When a person breathes, the chest wall moves in and out, and any structures inside the chest and upper abdomen also move. In the past, when radiation beams were aimed at a target inside those areas of the body, movement had to be accounted for by planning a large treatment area. With respiratory gating, radiation treatment is timed to an individual’s breathing pattern with the beam delivered only when the tumor is in the targeted area.

3-D Conformal Treatment Planning. 3-D conformal treatment planning and computer simulation produces an accurate image of the tumor and surrounding organs so that multiple radiation beams can be shaped exactly to the contour of the treatment area. Because the radiation beams are precisely focused, nearby normal tissue is spared from radiation. In 3-D conformal treatment planning, state-of-the-art radiation therapy immobilization devices and computerized dosimetric software are utilized so that CT scans can be directly incorporated into the radiation therapy plan.

Stereotactic Radiosurgery / Stereotactic Radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiosurgery / radiotherapy involves a single or a few intense high-dose fraction(s) of radiation to a small area. This form of therapy typically is used to treat tumors that cannot be treated by other means, such as surgery or chemotherapy. Precise calculations for radiation delivery are required. Treatment also requires extensive clinical planning and is provided in conjunction with the referring surgeon and under the direct supervision of a radiation oncologist and a physicist. Stereotactic radiosurgery often involves very careful immobilization of the patient. For example, cranial radiosurgery might involve the use of a neurosurgical head frame to assure precise tumor localization. With recent advances in imaging technologies, stereotactic technique can now be used to treat extra-cranial cancers to a higher dose with target localization and image verifications. These advances broaden the types of cancers that can be successfully treated with stereotactic radiosurgery.

Brachytherapy. Brachytherapy involves the use of surgical and fiberoptic procedures to place high-dose rate or low-dose rate sources of radiation in the patient’s body. This technique is used for implantation of sources into the prostate, intraluminal therapy within the esophagus and endobronchial therapy within the lungs. Prostate seed implants involve the permanent placement of radioactive pellets within the prostate gland.

High-Dose Rate Remote Brachytherapy. In high-dose rate remote brachytherapy, a computer sends the radioactive source through a tube to a catheter or catheters that have been placed near the tumor by the specialist working with the radiation oncologist. The radioactivity remains at the tumor for only a few minutes. In some cases, several remote treatments may be required, and the catheters may stay in place between treatments. High-dose rate remote brachytherapy is available in most of our local markets and patients receiving this treatment are able to return home after each treatment. This form of brachytherapy has been used to treat cancers of the cervix, breast, lung, biliary tree, prostate and esophagus. MammoSite ® Radiation Therapy is used for partial breast irradiation and works by delivering radiation from inside the lumpectomy cavity directly to the tissue where the cancer is most likely to recur.

Low-Dose Rate Brachytherapy. We are actively involved in radioactive seed implantation for prostate cancer, the most frequent application of low-dose rate brachytherapy. There are several advantages to low-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer, including convenience to the patient as the patient generally can resume normal daily activities within hours after the procedure. This procedure is performed by a team of physicians and staff with nearly a decade of experience in prostate brachytherapy. During the procedure, radioactive sources or “seeds” are inserted directly into the prostate, minimizing radiation exposure to surrounding tissues while permitting an escalation of the dose concentrated in the area of the cancer.

All of our markets provide external beam treatments and following is a list of the advanced services and treatments that we offer within each of our 24 local markets as of December 31, 2006:

                              Stereotactic    Brachytherapy

Local market
  

Year

Established
  

Number of

Centers
   IMRT    3-D    IGRT    Cranial    Extra-
Cranial
   High
Dose
  

Low

Dose

Lee County—Florida
   1983    5    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü

Charlotte/ Desoto Counties—Florida
   1986    2    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü

Sarasota/ Manatee Counties—Florida
   1992    4    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü

Collier County—Florida
   1993    2    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü

Broward County—Florida
   1993    4    ü    ü    ü    ü       ü    ü

Dade County—Florida
   1996    2    ü    ü    ü             ü

Las Vegas, Nevada
   1997    9    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü

Westchester/ Bronx—New York
   1997    3    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü

Mohawk Valley, New York
   1998    3    ü    ü    ü    ü       ü    ü

Delmarva Peninsula
   1998    3    ü    ü    ü          ü    ü

Northwest Florida
   2001    3    ü    ü    ü          ü    ü

Western North Carolina
   2002    7    ü    ü             ü    ü

Palm Beach County—Florida
   2002    1    ü    ü    ü          ü    ü

Central Kentucky
   2003    3    ü    ü    ü          ü    ü

Florida Keys
   2003    1    ü    ü    ü             ü

Southeastern Alabama
   2003    2    ü    ü    ü          ü    ü

Central Maryland
   2003    4    ü    ü    ü             ü

South New Jersey
   2004    3    ü    ü    ü          ü    ü

Rhode Island
   2004    3    ü    ü    ü    ü       ü    ü

Scottsdale, Arizona
   2005    1    ü    ü    ü    ü       ü    ü

Holyoke, Massachusetts
   2005    1    ü    ü             ü    ü

Palm Springs, California
   2005    1    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü    ü

Los Angeles, California
   2006    2    ü    ü             ü    ü

Southeastern Michigan
   2006    7    ü    ü             ü    ü

Treatment Centers

As of December 31, 2006, we owned, operated and managed 66 freestanding and 10 hospital-based treatment centers in our 24 local markets of which:

  •  

22 were internally developed;   •  

44 were acquired; and   •  

10 are hospital-based. Internally Developed. As of December 31, 2006, we operated 22 internally developed treatment centers located in California, Florida, Maryland, Nevada and Rhode Island and although we did not internally develop any new treatment centers in 2006, we plan to continue developing new treatment centers within our local markets. Our team is experienced in the design and construction of radiation treatment centers, having developed 5 treatment centers in the past three years. Our newly-developed treatment centers typically achieve positive cash flow within six to twelve months after opening. The following table sets forth the locations and other information regarding each of our internally developed radiation treatment centers in our local markets as of December 31, 2006:

Treatment Center
   Year    Owned/Managed Lee County—Florida      

Broadway
   1983    Owned

Cape Coral
   1984    Owned

Lakes Park
   1987    Owned

Bonita Springs
   2002    Owned

Lehigh Acres
   2003    Owned Charlotte/ Desoto Counties—Florida      

Port Charlotte
   1986    Owned

Arcadia
   1993    Owned Sarasota/ Manatee Counties—Florida      

Englewood
   1992    Owned

Sarasota
   1996    Owned

Venice
   1998    Owned

Bradenton
   2002    Owned Collier County—Florida      

South Naples
   1993    Owned

North Naples
   1999    Owned Northwest—Florida      

Destin
   2004    Owned

Crestview
   2004    Owned Palm Beach County—Florida      

West Palm Beach (1)
   2002    Owned Las Vegas, Nevada      

Henderson
   2000    Managed

Lake Mead
   2000    Managed Central Maryland      

Owings Mills (2)
   2003    Owned Rhode Island      

Woonsocket (3)
   2004    Owned

South County (4)
   2005    Owned Palm Springs, California      

Palm Springs
   2005    Managed (1) We own a 50.0% ownership interest in the limited liability company (LLC) that provides radiation oncologists and operates the treatment center; we also provide physics and dosimetry services to the LLC. (2) We have a 90.0% ownership interest in this treatment center. (3) We have a 62.0% ownership interest in this treatment center. (4) We have a 63.5% ownership interest in this treatment center.

Acquired Treatment Centers. As of December 31, 2006, we operated 44 acquired treatment centers located in Alabama, Arizona, California, Florida, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, and West Virginia. Over the past three years, we have acquired 24 treatment centers of which 11 were acquired in 2006. We plan to continue to enter new markets through the acquisition of established treatment centers that provide us the opportunity to leverage our current infrastructure. As part of our ongoing acquisition strategy, we continually evaluate potential acquisition opportunities.

The following table sets forth the locations and other information regarding each of the acquired radiation treatment centers in our local markets as of December 31, 2006:

Treatment Center
   Year    Owned/Managed Broward County—Florida      

Plantation
   1993    Owned

Deerfield Beach
   1994    Owned

Coral Springs
   1994    Owned

Tamarac
   1999    Owned Northwest Florida      

Fort Walton Beach
   2001    Owned Florida Keys      

Key West
   2003    Owned Las Vegas, Nevada      

Las Vegas (2 locations)
   1997    Managed

Las Vegas (5 locations)
   2005    Managed Westchester/ Bronx—New York      

Riverhill
   1998    Managed Delmarva Peninsula      

Berlin, Maryland (1)
   1998    Owned Western North Carolina      

Asheville
   2002    Managed

Clyde
   2002    Managed

Brevard
   2002    Managed

Franklin
   2002    Managed

Marion
   2002    Managed

Rutherford
   2002    Managed

Park Ridge
   2003    Managed Central Kentucky      

Danville
   2003    Owned

Louisville (2)
   2003    Owned

Frankfort
   2003    Owned Southeastern Alabama      

Dothan
   2003    Managed

Opp
   2006    Managed South New Jersey      

Woodbury
   2004    Owned

Voorhees
   2004    Owned

Willingboro
   2004    Owned Central Maryland      

Martinsburg, West Virginia (3)
   2005    Managed

Greenbelt, Maryland
   2005    Managed

Belcamp, Maryland (4)
   2005    Owned

Bel Air, Maryland
   2006    Owned Scottsdale, Arizona      

Scottsdale
   2005    Owned Holyoke, Massachusetts      

Holyoke
   2005    Managed Los Angeles, California      

Santa Monica
   2006    Managed

Beverly Hills
   2006    Managed Southeastern Michigan      

Pontiac
   2006    Managed

Madison Heights
   2006    Managed

Clarkson
   2006    Managed

Monroe
   2006    Managed

Farmington Hills
   2006    Managed

Eastpointe
   2006    Managed

Macomb
   2006    Managed (1) We have a 50.1% ownership interest in this treatment center

(2) We have a 90.0% ownership interest in this treatment center. (3) We have a 60.0% ownership interest in this treatment center. (4) Belcamp treatment center included in the acquisition of the Bel Air, Maryland treatment center, as we expect to combine the external beam treatments.

Hospital-Based Treatment Centers. As of December 31, 2006, we operated 10 hospital-based treatment centers. We provide services at all of our hospital-based treatment centers pursuant to written agreements with the hospitals. At the Florida treatment centers, we provide the services of our radiation oncologists to the hospital and receive the professional fees charged for such services. We also provide physics and dosimetry services on a fee-for-service basis. In 1998, we entered into a joint venture arrangement with a hospital in Mohawk Valley—New York. We have a 37% interest in the joint venture, which provides equipment for the three treatment centers that provide service in the Mohawk Valley local market. We also manage these treatment centers pursuant to an agreement with the hospital. On May 15, 2002, we executed an administrative services agreement with a hospital in Bronx, New York to provide administrative services and do so for a monthly fixed fee. In addition, effective March 1, 2006, we extended an administrative services agreement with a hospital in Salisbury, Maryland to provide administrative services for a 34-month term for a monthly fixed fee. A professional corporation owned by certain of our shareholders provides the radiation oncologists for this treatment center and the treatment centers in Mohawk Valley—New York. In connection with our hospital-based treatment center services, we provide technical and administrative services. Professional services in New York are provided by physicians employed by a professional corporation owned by certain of our officers, directors and principal shareholders. Professional services consist of services provided by radiation oncologists to patients. Technical services consist of the non-professional services provided by us in connection with radiation treatments administered to patients. Administrative services consist of services provided by us to the hospital-based center. The contracts under which the hospital based treatment centers are provided service are generally three to seven years with terms for renewal. The following table sets forth the locations and other information regarding each of our hospital-based radiation treatment centers in our local markets as of December 31, 2006:

          Services Provided

Treatment Center

   Year    Professional    Technical    Administrative
Dade County—Florida            

Hialeah

   1996    ü      

Aventura

   1999    ü    ü   
Westchester/ Bronx—New York            

Bronx (1)

   2003       ü    ü

Northern Westchester (1)

   2005       ü    ü
Mohawk Valley—New York            

Utica (1)

   1998       ü    ü

Rome (1)

   1999       ü    ü

Herkimer (1)

   1999       ü    ü
Delmarva Peninsula            

Salisbury, Maryland (2)

   2003       ü    ü

Seaford, Delaware (2)

   2003       ü    ü
Rhode Island            

Providence (3)

   2005       ü    ü
(1) Professional services are provided by physicians employed by a professional corporation owned by certain of our officers and directors. Our wholly-owned New York subsidiary contracts with the hospital through an administrative services agreement for the provision of technical and administrative services. (2) Professional services are provided by physicians employed by a professional corporation owned by certain of our officers and directors. Our wholly-owned Maryland subsidiary contracts with the hospital through an administrative services agreement for the provision of technical and administrative services. (3) Professional services are provided by physicians employed by a professional corporation owned by certain of our officers and directors. Our wholly-owned Massachusetts subsidiary contracts with the hospital through an administrative services agreement for the provision of technical and administrative services.

Treatment Center Structure

Arizona, Florida, Kentucky, Maryland, New Jersey, and Rhode Island Treatment Centers. In Arizona, Florida, Kentucky, Maryland, New Jersey, and Rhode Island we employ or contract with radiation oncologists and other healthcare professionals. Substantially all of our Florida, Kentucky, Maryland, New Jersey and Rhode Island radiation oncologists have employment agreements with us. While we exercise legal control over radiation oncologists we employ, we do not exercise control over, or otherwise influence, their medical judgment or professional decisions. Such radiation oncologists typically receive a base salary, fringe benefits and may be eligible for an incentive performance bonus. In addition to compensation, we provide our radiation oncologists with uniform benefit plans, such as disability, retirement, life and group health insurance and medical malpractice insurance. The radiation oncologists are required to hold a valid license to practice medicine in the jurisdiction in which they practice and, with respect to inpatient or hospital services, to become a member of the medical staff at the contracting hospital with privileges in radiation oncology. We are responsible for billing patients, hospitals and third-party payers for services rendered by our radiation oncologists. Most of our employment agreements prohibit the physician from competing with us within a defined geographic area and prohibit solicitation of our radiation oncologists, other employees or patients for a period of one to two years after termination of employment.

Alabama, California, Delaware, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, NewYork, North Carolina, and West Virginia Treatment Centers. Many states, including Alabama, California, Delaware, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New York, North Carolina, and West Virginia prohibit us from employing radiation oncologists. As a result, we operate our treatment centers in such states pursuant to administrative services agreements between professional corporations and our wholly-owned subsidiaries. In the states of Alabama, California and Massachusetts, our treatment centers are operated as physician office practices. We typically provide technical services to these treatment centers in addition to our administrative services. For the years ended December 31, 2005, and 2006 approximately 29.0% and 32.0% of our net patient service revenue, respectively, was generated by professional corporations with which we have administrative services agreements. The professional corporations with which we have administrative services agreements in California, Delaware, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New York, North Carolina and West Virginia are owned by certain of our executive officers, directors and shareholders, who are licensed to practice medicine in the respective state. In Alabama, the professional corporation with which we have an administrative services agreement is owned by a radiation oncologist licensed to practice medicine in Alabama.

Our administrative services agreements generally obligate us to provide certain treatment centers with equipment, staffing, accounting services, billing and collection services, management, technical and administrative personnel, assistance in managed care contracting and assistance in marketing. Our administrative services agreements typically provide for the professional corporations to pay us a fixed monthly service fee, which represents the fair market value of our services. It also provides for the parties to meet annually to reevaluate the value of our services and establish the fair market value. In Alabama, California, and Nevada we are paid a fee based upon a fixed percentage of global revenue. In Michigan, we are paid a fee based upon a fixed percentage of net income. The terms of our administrative services agreements with professional corporations range from 20 to 25 years and typically renew automatically for additional five-year periods. Under related agreements in certain states, we have the right to designate purchases of shares held by the physician owners of the professional corporations to qualified individuals under certain circumstances.

Our administrative services agreements contain restrictive covenants that preclude the professional corporations from hiring another management services organization for some period after termination. The professional corporations are parties to employment agreements with the radiation oncologists. The terms of these employment agreements typically range from three to five years depending on the physician’s experience. The employment agreements also typically require the radiation oncologists to use their best efforts to network with referring physicians and otherwise contain covenants not to compete.

Marketing

Our radiation oncologists are primarily referred patients by: primary care physicians, medical oncologists, surgical oncologists, urologists, pulmonologists, neurosurgeons and other physicians within the medical community. Our radiation oncologists are expected to actively develop their referral base by establishing strong clinical relationships with referring physicians. Our radiation oncologists develop these relationships by describing the variety and advanced nature of the therapies offered at our treatment centers, by providing seminars on advanced treatment procedures and by involving the referring physicians in those advanced treatment procedures. Patient referrals to our radiation oncologists also are influenced by managed care organizations with which we actively pursue contractual agreements.

We create standardized educational and informational materials for our treatment centers. In addition, we advertise our treatment centers and radiation oncologists in select markets.

Employees

As of December 31, 2006, we employed approximately 1,240 persons. As of December 31, 2006, we were affiliated with 86 radiation oncologists of which 65 are employed by us. We do not employ any radiation oncologists in Alabama, California, Delaware, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New York, North Carolina or West Virginia. None of our employees is a party to a collective bargaining agreement and we consider our relationship with our employees to be good. There currently is a nationwide shortage of radiation oncologists, medical technicians and other medical support personnel, which makes recruiting and retaining these employees difficult. We provide competitive wages and benefits and offer our employees a professional work environment that we believe helps us recruit and retain the staff we need to operate and manage our treatment centers. In addition to our radiation oncologists we currently employ 11 gynecologic oncologists, 8 surgical oncologists and 17 urologists whose practices complement our business in four markets in Florida and in our Michigan operations.

Seasonality

Our results of operations historically have fluctuated on a quarterly basis and can be expected to continue to fluctuate. Many of the patients of our Florida treatment centers are part-time residents in Florida during the winter months. Hence, these treatment centers have historically experienced higher utilization rates during the winter months than during the remainder of the year. In addition, referrals are typically lower in the summer months due to traditional vacation periods.

Insurance

We are subject to claims and legal actions in the ordinary course of business. To cover these claims, we maintain professional malpractice liability insurance and general liability insurance in amounts we believe are sufficient for our operations. We maintain professional malpractice liability insurance that provides primary coverage on a claims-made basis per incident and in annual aggregate amounts. Our professional malpractice liability insurance coverage is provided by Lexington Insurance Company and in turn reinsured by an insurance company owned by certain of our officers and directors. This insurance company is managed by an affiliate of Aon Corporation. The malpractice insurance provided by this insurance company varies in coverage limits for individual physicians. The insurance company also carries excess claims-made coverage through Lloyd’s of London in the aggregate amount of $15.0 million.

In addition, we currently maintain multiple layers of umbrella coverage through our general liability insurance policies in the aggregate amount of $10.0 million. We maintain Directors and Officers liability insurance in the aggregate amount of $25.0 million.

Hazardous Materials

We are subject to various federal, state and local laws and regulations governing the use, discharge and disposal of hazardous materials, including medical waste products. We believe that all of our treatment centers comply with these laws and regulations and we do not anticipate that any of these laws will have a material adverse effect on our operations.

Although our linear accelerators and certain other equipment do not use radioactive or other hazardous materials, our treatment centers do provide specialized treatment involving the implantation of radioactive material in the prostate and other organs. The radioactive sources generally are obtained from, and returned to, the suppliers, which have the ultimate responsibility for their proper disposal. We, however, remain subject to state and federal laws regulating the protection of employees who may be exposed to hazardous material and the proper handling, storage and disposal of that material.

Competition

The radiation therapy market is highly fragmented and our business is highly competitive. Competition may result from other radiation oncology practices, solo practitioners, companies in other healthcare industry segments, large physician group practices or radiation oncology physician practice management companies, hospitals and other operators of other radiation treatment centers, some of which may have greater financial and other resources than us.

Intellectual Property

We have not registered our service marks or any of our logos with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. However, some of our service marks and logos may be subject to other common law intellectual property rights. To date, we have not relied heavily on patents or other intellectual property in operating our business. Nevertheless, some of the information technology purchased or used by us may be patented or subject to other intellectual property rights. As a result,

we may be found to be, or actions may be brought against us alleging that we are, infringing on the trademark, patent or other intellectual property rights of others, which could give rise to substantial claims against us. In the future, we may wish to obtain or develop trademarks, patents or other intellectual property. However, other practices and public entities, including universities, may have filed applications for (or have been issued) trademarks or patents that may be the same as or similar to those developed or otherwise obtained by us or that we may need in the development of our own intellectual property. The scope and validity of such trademark, patent and other intellectual property rights, the extent to which we may wish or need to acquire such rights and the cost or availability of such rights are presently unknown. In addition, we cannot provide assurance that others will not obtain access to our intellectual property or independently develop the same or similar intellectual property to that developed or otherwise obtained by us.

Government Regulations

The healthcare industry is highly regulated and the federal and state laws that affect our business are significant. Federal law and regulations are based primarily upon the Medicare and Medicaid programs, each of which is financed, at least in part, with federal money. State jurisdiction is based upon the state’s authority to license certain categories of healthcare professionals and providers and the state’s interest in regulating the quality of healthcare in the state, regardless of the source of payment. The significant areas of federal and state regulatory laws that could affect our ability to conduct our business include those regarding:

  •  

false and other improper claims;   •  

the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, or HIPAA;   •  

civil and monetary penalties law;   •  

privacy, security and code set regulations;   •  

anti-kickback laws;   •  

the Stark Laws and other self-referral and financial inducement laws;   •  

fee-splitting;   •  

corporate practice of medicine;   •  

anti-trust;   •  

licensing; and   •  

certificate of need. A violation of these laws could result in civil and criminal penalties, the refund of monies paid by government and/or private payers, exclusion of the physician, the practice or us from participation in Medicare and Medicaid programs and/or the loss of a physician’s license to practice medicine. We believe we exercise care in our efforts to structure our arrangements and our practices to comply with applicable federal and state laws. We have a Medicare Compliance Committee that periodically reviews our procedures and a Corporate Compliance Program in place to review our practices. Although we believe we are in material compliance with all applicable laws, these laws are complex and a review of our practices by a court, or law enforcement or regulatory authority could result in an adverse determination that could harm our business. Furthermore, the laws applicable to us are subject to change, interpretation and amendment, which could adversely affect our ability to conduct our business.

We estimate that approximately 53%, 50% and 52% of our net patient service revenue for 2004, 2005 and 2006, respectively, consisted of reimbursements from Medicaid and Medicare government programs. In order to be certified to participate in the Medicare and Medicaid programs, each provider must meet applicable regulations of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) relating to, among other things, the type of facility, operating policies and procedures, maintenance equipment, personnel, standards of medical care and compliance with applicable state and local laws. Our radiation treatment centers are certified to participate in the Medicare and Medicaid programs.

Federal Law

The federal healthcare laws apply in any case in which we are providing an item or service that is reimbursable under Medicare or Medicaid. The principal federal laws that affect our business include those that prohibit the filing of false or improper claims with the Medicare or Medicaid programs, those that prohibit unlawful inducements for the referral of business reimbursable under Medicare or Medicaid and those that prohibit the provision of certain services by a provider to a patient if the patient was referred by a physician with which the provider has certain types of financial relationships.

False and Other Improper Claims. Under the federal False Claims Act, the government may fine us if we knowingly submit, or participate in submitting, any claims for payment to the federal government that are false or fraudulent, or that contain false or misleading information. A provider can be found liable not only for submitting false claims with actual knowledge, but also for doing so with reckless disregard or deliberate ignorance of such falseness. In addition, knowingly making or using a false record or statement to receive payment from the federal government is also a violation. If we are ever found to have violated the False Claims Act, we could be required to make significant payments to the government (including damages and penalties in addition to the reimbursements previously collected) and could be excluded from participating in Medicare, Medicaid and other federal healthcare programs. Many states have similar false claims statutes. Healthcare fraud is a priority of the United States Department of Justice, Office of Inspector General and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (“FBI”). They have devoted a significant amount of resources to investigating healthcare fraud.

While the criminal statutes generally are reserved for instances evidencing fraudulent intent, the civil and administrative penalty statutes are being applied by the federal government in an increasingly broad range of circumstances. Examples of the type of activity giving rise to liability for filing false claims include billing for services not rendered, misrepresenting services rendered (i.e., mis-coding) and application for duplicate reimbursement. Additionally, the federal government takes the position that a pattern of claiming reimbursement for unnecessary services violates these statutes if the claimant should have known that the services were unnecessary. The federal government also takes the position that claiming reimbursement for services that are substandard is a violation of these statutes if the claimant should have known that the care was substandard. Criminal penalties also are available in the case of claims filed with private insurers if the federal government shows that the claims constitute mail fraud or wire fraud or violate a number of federal criminal healthcare fraud statutes.

State Medicaid agencies also have certain fraud and abuse authority. In addition, private insurers may bring actions under state false claim laws. In certain circumstances, federal and some state laws authorize private whistleblowers to bring false claim or “qui tam” suits on behalf of the government against providers and reward the whistleblower with a portion of any final recovery. In addition, the federal government has engaged a number of nongovernmental-audit organizations to assist it in tracking and recovering false claims for healthcare services.

Governmental investigations and whistleblower “qui tam” suits against healthcare companies have increased significantly in recent years and have resulted in substantial penalties and fines.

We submit thousands of reimbursement claims to Medicare and Medicaid each year and there can be no assurance that there are no errors. We believe our billing and documentation practices comply with applicable laws and regulations in all material respects. Although we monitor our billing practices for compliance with applicable laws, such laws are very complex and we might not have sufficient regulation guidance to assist us in our interpretation of these laws.

HIPAA Criminal Penalties. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, or HIPAA, created criminal provisions, which impose criminal penalties for fraud against any healthcare benefit program for theft or embezzlement involving healthcare and for false statements in connection with the payment of any health benefits. HIPAA also provided for broad prosecutorial subpoena authority and authorized property forfeiture upon conviction of a federal healthcare offense. Significantly, the HIPAA provisions apply not only to federal programs, but also to private health benefit programs. HIPAA also broadened the authority of the Office of Inspector General (OIG) to exclude participants from federal healthcare programs. Because of the uncertainties as to how the HIPAA provisions will be enforced, we currently are unable to predict their ultimate impact on us. If the government were to seek any substantial penalties against us, this could have a material adverse effect on us.

HIPAA Civil Penalties. HIPAA broadened the scope of certain fraud and abuse laws by adding several civil statutes that apply to all healthcare services, whether or not they are reimbursed under a federal healthcare program. HIPAA established civil monetary penalties for certain conduct, including upcoding and billing for medically unnecessary goods or services.

HIPAA Administrative Simplifications. HIPAA includes statutory provisions which have authorized the Department of Health and Human Services, or HHS to issue regulations and standards for electronic transactions regarding the privacy and security of healthcare information which apply to us and our treatment centers.

The HIPAA regulations include:

  •  

privacy regulations that protect individual privacy by limiting the uses and disclosures of individually identifiable health information and creating various privacy rights for individuals;   •  

security regulations that require covered entities to implement administrative, physical and technological safeguards to ensure the confidentiality, integrity and availability of individually identifiable health information in electronic form; and   •  

transaction standards and regulations that prescribe specific transaction formats and data code sets for specified electronic healthcare transactions. If we fail to comply with the HIPAA regulations, we may be subject to civil monetary penalties enforced by HHS and, in certain circumstances, criminal penalties enforced by the Department of Justice. Under HIPAA, covered entities may be subject to civil monetary penalties in the amount of $100 per violation, capped at a maximum of $25,000 per year for violation of any particular standard. However, civil monetary penalties may not be assessed if a covered entity’s failure to comply is based on reasonable cause and not willful neglect, and the failure to comply is remedied within 30 days, or a longer period determined to be appropriate by HHS. On April 17, 2003, HHS published an interim final rule regarding civil monetary penalties. The rule largely deals with procedural issues regarding imposition of penalties, and does not address substantive issues regarding what violations will result in the imposition of a civil monetary penalty and what factors will be taken into account in determining the amount of a penalty. The U.S. Department of Justice may seek to impose criminal penalties for intentional violations of HIPAA. Criminal penalties under HIPAA vary depending upon the nature of the violation but could include fines of up to $250,000 and/or imprisonment.

The HIPAA regulations related to privacy establish comprehensive federal standards relating to the use and disclosure of individually identifiable health information or protected health information. The privacy regulations establish limits on the use and disclosure of protected health information, provide for patients’ rights, including rights to access, request amendment of, and receive an accounting of certain disclosures of protected health information, and require certain safeguards to protect protected health information. In general, the privacy regulations do not supersede state laws that are more stringent or grant greater privacy rights to individuals. Thus, we must reconcile the privacy regulations and other state privacy laws. Our operations that are regulated by HIPAA were required to be in compliance with the privacy regulations by April 14, 2003. We believe our operations are in material compliance with the privacy regulations, but there can be no assurance that the federal government would determine that we are in compliance.

The HIPAA security regulations establish detailed requirements for safeguarding protected health information that is electronically transmitted or electronically stored. We were required to comply with the security regulations by April 21, 2005. Some of the security regulations are technical in nature, while others may be addressed through policies and procedures. The technical regulations required us to incur significant costs in ensuring that our systems and facilities have in place all of the administrative, technical and physical safeguards to meet all of the implementation specifications. We believe our operations are in material compliance with the security regulations, but there can be no assurance that the federal government would determine that we are in compliance.

The HIPAA transaction standards regulations are intended to simplify the electronic claims process and other healthcare transactions by encouraging electronic transmission rather than paper submission. These regulations provide for uniform standards for data reporting, formatting and coding that we must use in certain transactions with health plans. Our compliance date for these regulations was October 16, 2003 and we implemented or upgraded our computer and information systems as we believed necessary to comply with the new regulations.

Although we believe that we are in material compliance with these HIPAA regulations with which compliance is currently required, the HIPAA regulations are expected to continue to impact us operationally and financially and will pose increased regulatory risk.

Anti-Kickback Law. Federal law commonly known as the “Anti-kickback Statute” prohibits the knowing and willful offer, solicitation, payment or receipt of anything of value (direct or indirect, overt or covert, in cash or in kind) which is intended to induce:

  •  

the referral of an individual for a service for which payment may be made by Medicare and Medicaid or certain other federal healthcare programs; or   •  

the ordering, purchasing, leasing, or arranging for, or recommending the purchase, lease or order of, any service or item for which payment may be made by Medicare, Medicaid or certain other federal healthcare programs. The law has been broadly interpreted by a number of courts to prohibit remuneration which is offered or paid for otherwise legitimate purposes if the circumstances show that one purpose of the arrangement is to induce referrals. Even bona fide investment interests in a healthcare provider may be questioned under the Anti-kickback Statute if the government concludes that the opportunity to invest was offered as an inducement for referrals. The penalties for violations of this law include criminal sanctions including fines and/or imprisonment and exclusion from federal healthcare programs.

The federal government has published regulations that provide “safe-harbors” that protect from prosecution under the Anti-kickback Statute business transactions that meet certain requirements. Failure to meet the requirements of a safe harbor, however, does not necessarily mean a transaction violates the Anti-kickback Statute. There are several aspects of our relationships with physicians to which the Anti-kickback Statute may be relevant. We claim reimbursement from Medicare or Medicaid for services that are ordered, in some cases, by our radiation oncologists who hold shares, or options to purchase shares, of our common stock. In addition, other physicians who are investors in us may refer patients to us for those services. Although neither the existing nor potential investments in us by physicians qualify for protection under the safe harbor regulations, we do not believe that these activities fall within the type of activities the Anti-kickback Statute was intended to prohibit. We also claim reimbursement from Medicare and Medicaid for services referred from other healthcare providers with whom we have financial arrangements. While we believe that these arrangements generally fall within applicable safe harbors or otherwise do not violate the law, there can be no assurance that the government will agree, in which event we could be harmed.

We believe our operations are in material compliance with applicable Medicare and Medicaid and fraud and abuse laws and seek to structure arrangements to comply with applicable safe harbors where reasonably possible. There is a risk however, that the federal government might investigate such arrangements and conclude they violate the Anti-kickback Statute. If our arrangements were found to be illegal, we, the physician groups and/or the individual physicians would be subject to civil and criminal penalties, including exclusion from the participation in government reimbursement programs, and our arrangements would not be legally enforceable, which could materially adversely affect us.

Additionally, the OIG issues advisory opinions that provide advice on whether proposed business arrangements violate the anti-kickback law. In Advisory Opinion 98-4, the OIG addressed physician practice management arrangements. In Advisory Opinion 98-4, the OIG found that administrative services fees based on a percentage of practice revenue may violate the Anti-kickback Statute. This Advisory Opinion suggests that OIG might challenge certain prices below Medicare reimbursement rates or arrangements based on a percentage of revenue. We believe that the fees we charge for our services under the administrative services agreements are commensurate with the fair market value of the services. While we believe our arrangements are in material compliance with applicable law and regulations, OIG’s advisory opinion suggests there is a risk of an adverse OIG finding relating to practices reviewed in the advisory opinion. Any such finding could have a material adverse impact on us.

The Stark Self-Referral Law. We are also subject to federal and state statutes banning payments for referral of patients and referrals by physicians to healthcare providers with whom the physicians have a financial relationship. The Stark Self-Referral Law (Stark II) prohibits a physician from referring a patient to a healthcare provider for certain designated health services reimbursable by Medicare or Medicaid if the physician has a financial relationship with that provider, including an investment interest, a loan or debt relationship or a compensation relationship. The designated services covered by the law include radiology services, infusion therapy, radiation therapy and supplies, outpatient prescription drugs and hospital services, among others. In addition to the conduct directly prohibited by the law, the statute also prohibits “circumvention schemes”, that are designed to obtain referrals indirectly that cannot be made directly. The penalties for violating the law include:

  •  

a refund of any Medicare or Medicaid payments for services that resulted from an unlawful referral;   •  

civil fines; and   •  

exclusion from the Medicare and Medicaid programs. Stark II contains exceptions applicable to our operations. For example, Stark II exempts any referrals of radiation oncologists for radiation therapy if (1) the request is part of a consultation initiated by another physician; and (2) the tests or services are furnished by or under the supervision of the radiation oncologist. We believe the services rendered by our radiation oncologists will comply with this exception.

Some physicians who are not radiation oncologists are employed by companies owned by us or by professional corporations owned by certain of our directors, officers and principal shareholders with which we have administrative services agreements. To the extent these professional corporations employ such physicians, and they are deemed to have made referrals for radiation therapy, their referrals will be permissible under Stark II if they meet a separate exception for employees. The employment exception requires, among other things, that the compensation be consistent with the fair market value of the services provided, and that it not take into account (directly or indirectly) the volume or value of any referrals by the referring physician.

When physician employees who are not radiation oncologists have ownership interests in our company, additional Stark II exceptions may be applied, including the exception for in-office ancillary services. Another potentially applicable Stark II exception is one for physician’s ownership of publicly traded securities in a corporation with shareholders’ equity exceeding $75 million as of the end of the most recent fiscal year.

We believe that our current operations comply in all material respects with Stark II, due to, among other things, various exceptions stated in Stark II and regulations that exempt either the referral or the financial relationship involved. Nevertheless, to the extent physicians affiliated with us make referrals to us and a financial relationship exists between the referring physicians and us, the government might take the position that the arrangement does not comply with Stark II. Any such finding could have a material adverse impact on us.

State Law

State Anti-Kickback Laws. Many states in which we operate have laws that prohibit the payment of kickbacks in return for the referral of patients. Some of these laws apply only to services reimbursable under the state Medicaid program. However, a number of these laws apply to all healthcare services in the state, regardless of the source of payment for the service. Although we believe that these laws prohibit payments to referral sources only where a principal purpose for the payment is for the referral, the laws in most states regarding kickbacks have been subjected to limited judicial and regulatory interpretation and, therefore, no assurances can be given that our activities will be found to be in compliance. Noncompliance with such laws could have a material adverse effect upon us and subject us and the physicians involved to penalties and sanctions.

State Self-Referral Laws. A number of states in which we operate, such as Florida, have enacted self-referral laws that are similar in purpose to Stark II. However, each state law is unique. The state laws and regulations vary significantly from state to state, are often vague and, in many cases, have not been widely interpreted by courts or regulatory agencies. For example, some states only prohibit referrals where the physician’s financial relationship with a healthcare provider is based upon an investment interest. Other state laws apply only to a limited number of designated health services. Finally, some states do not prohibit referrals, but merely require that a patient be informed of the financial relationship before the referral is made.

These statutes and regulations generally apply to services reimbursed by both governmental and private payers. Violations of these laws may result in prohibition of payment for services rendered, loss of licenses as well as fines and criminal penalties. State statutes and regulations affecting the referral of patients to healthcare providers range from statutes and regulations that are substantially the same as the federal laws and safe harbor regulations to a simple requirement that physicians or other healthcare professionals disclose to patients any financial relationship the physicians or healthcare professionals have with a healthcare provider that is being recommended to the patients. We believe that we are in compliance with the self-referral law of each state in which we have a financial relationship with a physician. However, adverse judicial or administrative interpretations of any of these laws could have a material adverse effect on our operating results and financial condition. In addition, expansion of our operations into new jurisdictions, or new interpretations of laws in existing jurisdictions, could require structural and organizational modifications of our relationships with physicians to comply with that jurisdiction’s laws. Such structural and organizational modifications could have a material adverse effect on our operating results and financial condition.

Fee-Splitting Laws. Many states in which we operate prohibit the splitting or sharing of fees between physicians and non-physicians. These laws vary from state to state and are enforced by courts and regulatory agencies, each with broad discretion. Most of the states with fee-splitting laws only prohibit a physician from sharing fees with a referral source. However, some states have a broader prohibition against any splitting of a physician’s fees, regardless of whether the other party is a referral source. Some states have interpreted management agreements between entities and physicians as unlawful fee-splitting. In most cases, it is not considered to be fee-splitting when the payment made by the physician is reasonable reimbursement for services rendered on the physician’s behalf.

In certain states, we receive fees from professional corporations owned by certain of our shareholders under administrative services agreements. We believe we structured these fee provisions to comply with applicable state laws relating to fee-splitting. However, there can be no certainty that, if challenged, either us or the professional corporations will be found to be in compliance with each state’s fee-splitting laws, and, if challenged successfully, this could have a material adverse effect upon us.

We believe our arrangements with physicians comply in all material respects with the fee-splitting laws of the states in which we operate. Nevertheless, it is possible regulatory authorities or other parties could claim we are engaged in fee-splitting. If such a claim were successfully asserted in any jurisdiction, our radiation oncologists could be subject to civil and criminal penalties, professional discipline and we could be required to restructure our contractual and other arrangements. Any restructuring of our contractual and other arrangements with physician practices could result in lower revenue from such practices, increased expenses in the operation of such practices and reduced influence over the business decisions of such practices. Alternatively, some of our existing contracts could be found to be illegal and unenforceable, which could result in the termination of those contracts and an associated loss of revenue. In addition, expansion of our operations to other states with fee-splitting prohibitions may require structural and organizational modification to the form of relationships that we currently have with physicians, affiliated practices and hospitals. Any modifications could result in less profitable relationships with physicians, affiliated practices and hospitals, less influence over the business decisions of physicians and affiliated practices and failure to achieve our growth objectives.

Corporate Practice of Medicine. We are not licensed to practice medicine. The practice of medicine is conducted solely by our licensed radiation oncologists and other licensed physicians. The manner in which licensed physicians can be organized to perform and bill for medical services is governed by the laws of the state in which medical services are provided and by the medical boards or other entities authorized by such states to oversee the practice of medicine. Most states prohibit any person or entity other than a licensed professional from holding him, her or itself out as a provider of diagnoses, treatment or care of patients. Many states extend this prohibition to bar companies not wholly-owned by licensed physicians from employing physicians, a practice commonly referred to as the “Corporate Practice of Medicine”, to maintain physician independence and clinical judgment.

Business corporations are generally not permitted under certain state laws to exercise control over the medical judgments or decisions of physicians, or engage in certain practices such as fee-splitting with physicians. In states where we are not permitted to own a medical practice, we perform only non-medical and administrative and support services, do not represent to the public or clients that we offer professional medical services and do not exercise influence or control over the practice of medicine.

Corporate Practice of Medicine laws vary widely regarding the extent to which a licensed physician can affiliate with corporate entities for the delivery of medical services. Florida is an example of a state that requires all practicing physicians to meet requirements for safe practice, but it has no provisions setting forth how physicians can be organized. In Florida, it is not uncommon for business corporations to own medical practices. New York, by contrast, prohibits physicians from sharing revenue received in connection with the furnishing of medical care, other than with a partner, employee or associate in a professional corporation, subcontractor or physician consultant relationship. We have developed arrangements which we believe are in compliance with the Corporate Practice of Medicine laws in the states in which we operate.

We believe our operations and contractual arrangements as currently conducted are in material compliance with existing applicable laws. However, we cannot assure you that we will be successful if our existing organization and our contractual arrangements with the professional corporations are challenged as constituting the unlicensed practice of medicine. In addition, we might not be able to enforce certain of our arrangements, including non-competition agreements and transition and stock pledge agreements. While the precise penalties for violation of state laws relating to the corporate practice of medicine vary from state to state, violations could lead to fines, injunctive relief dissolving a corporate offender or criminal felony charges. There can be no assurance that review of our business and the professional corporations by courts or regulatory authorities will not result in a determination that could adversely affect their operations or that the healthcare regulatory environment will not change so as to restrict existing operations or their expansion. In the event of action by any regulatory authority limiting or prohibiting us or any affiliate from carrying on our business or from expanding our operations and our affiliates to certain jurisdictions, structural and organizational modifications of us may be required, which could adversely affect our ability to conduct our business.

Antitrust Laws. In connection with the Corporate Practice of Medicine laws referred to above, certain of the physician practices with which we are affiliated are necessarily organized as separate legal entities. As such, the physician practice entities may be deemed to be persons separate both from us and from each other under the antitrust laws and, accordingly, subject to a wide range of laws that prohibit anticompetitive conduct among separate legal entities. These laws may limit our ability to enter into agreements with separate practices that compete with one another. In addition, where we also are seeking to acquire or affiliate with established and reputable practices in our target geographic markets and any market concentration could lead to antitrust claims.

We believe we are in material compliance with federal and state antitrust laws and intend to comply with any state and federal laws that may affect the development of our business. There can be no assurance, however, that a review of our business by courts or regulatory authorities would not adversely affect the operations of us and our affiliated physician practice entities.

State Licensing. As a provider of radiation therapy services in the states in which we operate, we must maintain current occupational and use licenses for our treatment centers as healthcare facilities and machine registrations for our linear accelerators and simulators. Additionally, we must maintain radioactive material licenses for each of our treatment centers which utilize radioactive sources. We believe that we possess or have applied for all requisite state and local licenses and are in material compliance with all state and local licensing requirements.

Certificate of Need. Many states in which we operate have Certificate of Need (CON) laws that require physicians or health care facilities seeking to initiate or expand services to submit an application to the state. In some states, approval must be obtained before initiating projects requiring capital expenditures above a certain dollar amount, introducing new services and/or expanding services. The CON program is intended to prevent unnecessary duplication of services and can be a competitive process whereby only one proposal among competing applicants who wish to provide a particular health service is chosen or a proposal by one applicant is challenged by another provider who may prevail in getting the state to deny the addition of the service.

In certain states these CON statutes and regulations apply to our related physician corporations and in others it applies to hospitals where we have management agreements or joint venture relationships.

We believe that we have applied for all requisite state CON approvals or notified state authorities as required by statute and are in material compliance with state requirements. There can be no assurance, however, that a review of our business or proposed new practices by regulatory authorities would not adversely affect the operations of us and our affiliated physician practice entities.

Reimbursement and Cost Containment

Reimbursement. We provide a full range of both professional and technical services. Those services include the initial consultation, clinical treatment planning, simulation, medical radiation physics, dosimetry, treatment devices, special services and clinical treatment management procedures.

The initial consultation is charged as a professional fee for evaluation of the patient prior to the decision to treat the patient with radiation therapy. The clinical treatment planning also is reimbursed as a technical and professional component. Simulation of the patient prior to treatment involves both a technical and a professional component, as the treatment plan is verified with the use of a simulator accompanied by the physician’s approval of the plan. The medical radiation physics, dosimetry, treatment devices and special services also include both professional and technical components. The basic dosimetry calculation is accomplished, treatment devices are specified and approved, and the physicist consults with the radiation oncologist, all as professional and technical components of the charge. Special blocks, wedges, shields, or casts are fabricated, all as a technical and professional component.

The delivery of the radiation treatment from the linear accelerator is a technical charge. The clinical treatment administrative services fee is the professional fee charged weekly for the physician’s management of the patient’s treatment. Global fees containing both professional and technical components also are charged for specialized treatment such as hyperthermia, clinical intracavitary hyperthermia, clinical brachytherapy, interstitial radioelement applications, and remote after-loading of radioactive sources.

Coding and billing for radiation therapy is complex. We maintain a staff of coding professionals responsible for interpreting the services documented on the patients’ charts to determine the appropriate coding of services for billing of

third-party payers. This staff provides coding and billing services for all of our treatment centers except for four treatment centers in New York. In addition, we do not provide coding and billing services to hospitals where we are providing only the professional component of radiation treatment services. We provide training for our coding staff and believe that our coding and billing expertise result in appropriate and timely reimbursement.

Cost Containment. We derived approximately 53%, 50% and 52% of our net patient service revenue for the years ended December 31, 2004, 2005 and 2006, respectively, from payments made by government sponsored healthcare programs, principally Medicare. These programs are subject to substantial regulation by the federal and state governments. Any change in payment regulations, policies, practices, interpretations or statutes that place limitations on reimbursement amounts, or changes in reimbursement coding, or practices could materially and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

In recent years, the federal government has sought to constrain the growth of spending in the Medicare and Medicaid programs. Through the Medicare program, the federal government has implemented a resource-based relative value scale (RBRVS) payment methodology for physician services. RBRVS is a fee schedule that, except for certain geographical and other adjustments, pays similarly situated physicians the same amount for the same services. The RBRVS is adjusted each year and is subject to increases or decreases at the discretion of Congress. Changes in the RBRVS may result in reductions in payment rates for procedures provided by the Company. RBRVS-type payment systems also have been adopted by certain private third-party payers and may become a predominant payment methodology. Broader implementation of such programs could reduce payments by private third-party payers and could indirectly reduce our operating margins to the extent that the cost of providing management services related to such procedures could not be proportionately reduced. To the extent our costs increase, we may not be able to recover such cost increases from government reimbursement programs. In addition, because of cost containment measures and market changes in non-governmental insurance plans, we may not be able to shift cost increases to non-governmental payers. Changes in the RBRVS could result in a reduction from historical levels in per patient Medicare revenue received by us; however, we do not believe such reductions would, if implemented, result in a material adverse effect on us.

In addition to current governmental regulation, both federal and state governments periodically propose legislation for comprehensive reforms affecting the payment for and availability of healthcare services. Aspects of certain of such healthcare proposals, such as reductions in Medicare and Medicaid payments, if adopted, could adversely affect us. Other aspects of such proposals, such as universal health insurance coverage and coverage of certain previously uncovered services, could have a positive impact on our business. It is not possible at this time to predict what, if any, reforms will be adopted by Congress or state legislatures, or when such reforms would be adopted and implemented. As healthcare reform progresses and the regulatory environment accommodates reform, it is likely that changes in state and federal regulations will necessitate modifications to our agreements and operations. While we believe we will be able to restructure in accordance with applicable laws and regulations, we cannot assure that such restructuring in all cases will be possible or profitable.

Although governmental payment reductions have not materially affected us in the past, it is possible that such changes in the future could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. In addition, Medicare, Medicaid and other government sponsored healthcare programs are increasingly shifting to some form of managed care. Additionally, funds received under all healthcare reimbursement programs are subject to audit with respect to the proper billing for physician services. Retroactive adjustments of revenue from these programs could occur. We expect that there will continue to be proposals to reduce or limit Medicare and Medicaid payment for services.

Rates paid by private third-party payers, including those that provide Medicare supplemental insurance, are based on established physician, clinic and hospital charges and are generally higher than Medicare payment rates. Changes in the mix of our patients between non-governmental payers and government sponsored healthcare programs, and among different types of non-government payer sources, could have a material adverse effect on us.

Reevaluations and Examination of Billing. Payers periodically reevaluate the services they cover. In some cases, government payers such as Medicare and Medicaid also may seek to recoup payments previously made for services determined not to be covered. Any such action by payers would have an adverse affect on our revenue and earnings.

Due to the uncertain nature of coding for radiation therapy services, we could be required to change coding practices or repay amounts paid for incorrect practices either of which could have a materially adverse effect on our operating results and financial condition.

Other Regulations. In addition, we are subject to licensing and regulation under federal, state and local laws relating to the collecting, storing, handling and disposal of infectious and hazardous waste and radioactive materials as well as the safety and health of laboratory employees. We believe our operations are in material compliance with applicable federal and state laws and regulations relating to the collection, storage, handling, treatment and disposal of all infectious and hazardous waste and radioactive materials. Nevertheless, there can be no assurance that our current or past operations would be deemed to be in compliance with applicable laws and regulations, and any noncompliance could result in a material adverse effect on us. We utilize licensed vendors for the disposal of such specimen and waste.

In addition to our comprehensive regulation of safety in the workplace, the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has established extensive requirements relating to workplace safety for healthcare employees, whose workers may be exposed to blood-borne pathogens, such as HIV and the hepatitis B virus. These regulations require work practice controls, protective clothing and equipment, training, medical follow-up, vaccinations and other measures designed to minimize exposure to, and transmission of, blood-borne pathogens.

Healthcare reform. The healthcare industry continues to attract much legislative interest and public attention. In recent years, an increasing number of legislative proposals have been introduced or proposed in Congress and in some state legislatures that would effect major changes in the healthcare system. Proposals that have been considered include changes in Medicare, Medicaid and other programs, cost controls on hospitals and mandatory health insurance coverage for employees. The costs of implementing some of these proposals would be financed, in part, by reduction in payments to healthcare providers under Medicare, Medicaid, and other government programs. We cannot predict the course of future healthcare legislation or other changes in the administration or interpretation of governmental healthcare programs and the effect that any legislation, interpretation, or change may have on us.

Item 1A. Risk Factors

Investing in our common stock involves risk. You should carefully consider the following risks, as well as the other information contained in this 10-K, including our consolidated financial statements and the related notes, before investing in our common stock.

Risks Related to Our Business

We depend on payments from government Medicare and Medicaid programs for a significant amount of our revenue and our business could be materially harmed by any changes that result in reimbursement reductions.

Our payer mix is highly focused toward Medicare patients due to the high proportion of cancer patients over the age of 65. We estimate that approximately 53%, 50% and 52% of our net patient service revenue for 2004, 2005 and 2006, respectively, consisted of payments from Medicare and Medicaid. These government programs generally reimburse us on a fee-for-service basis based on predetermined government reimbursement rate schedules. As a result of these reimbursement schedules, we are limited in the amount we can record as revenue for our services from these government programs. If our operating costs increase, we will not be able to recover these costs from government payers. Medicare reimbursement rates are determined by a formula which takes into account an industry wide conversion factor (CF) which may change on an annual basis. In 2003, the CF increased by 1.6%; in 2004, it increased by 1.5%; in 2005, the rate increased an additional 1.5%; and in 2006 the CF remained unchanged at the 2005 level. The net result of these changes in the conversion factor in the past several years has not had a significant impact on our business. There can be no assurance that increases will continue, scheduled increases will materialize or decreases will not occur in the future. Changes in the Medicare, Medicaid or similar government programs that limit or reduce the amounts paid to us for any of our services or specific procedures could cause our revenue and profitability to decline.

If payments by managed care organizations and other commercial payers decrease, our revenue and profitability could be adversely affected.

We estimate that approximately 46%, 47% and 46% of our net patient service revenue for 2004, 2005 and 2006, respectively, was derived from commercial payers such as managed care organizations and private health insurance programs. These commercial payers generally pay us for the services rendered to an insured patient based upon predetermined rates. Managed care organizations typically pay at lower rates than private health insurance programs. While commercial payer rates are generally higher than government program reimbursement rates, commercial payer rates are based in part on Medicare reimbursement rates and when Medicare rates are lowered, commercial rates are often lowered as well. If managed care organizations and other private insurers reduce their rates or we experience a significant shift in our revenue mix toward additional managed care payers or Medicare or Medicaid reimbursements, then our revenue and profitability will decline and our operating margins will be reduced. Any inability to maintain suitable financial arrangements with commercial payers could have a material adverse impact on our business.

We have potential conflicts of interest relating to our related party transactions which could harm our business.

We have potential conflicts of interest relating to existing agreements we have with certain of our directors, officers, principal shareholders, shareholders and employees. In 2004, 2005 and 2006, we paid an aggregate of $8.1 million, $7.3 million and $11.8 million, respectively under our related party agreements and we received $26.7 million, $24.8 million and $35.0 million, respectively pursuant to our administrative service agreements with related parties. Potential conflicts of interest can exist if a related party director or officer has to make a decision that has different implications for us and the related party.

If a dispute arises in connection with any of these agreements, if not resolved satisfactorily to us, our business could be harmed. These agreements include our:

  •  

administrative services agreements with professional corporations that are owned by certain of our directors, officers and principal shareholders;   •  

leases we have entered into with entities owned by certain of our directors, officers, and principal shareholders; and   •  

medical malpractice insurance which we acquire from an entity owned by certain of our directors, officers, and principal shareholders. In California, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New York and North Carolina, we have administrative services agreements with professional corporations that are owned by certain of our directors, officers and principal shareholders. Michael J. Katin, M.D., a director, is a licensed physician in the states of California, Michigan, Nevada and North Carolina and we have administrative services agreements with his professional corporations in these states. In the state of New York, our Chairman, Howard M. Sheridan, M.D., our Chief Executive Officer and President, Daniel E. Dosoretz, M.D., our Medical Director, James H. Rubenstein, M.D. and Dr. Katin, are licensed physicians and we have administrative services agreements with their professional corporation. Additionally, Dr. Katin, a principal shareholder, is a licensed physician in the state of Maryland and we have an administrative services agreement with his professional corporation in this state. While we have transition agreements in place in all states except New York that provide us with the ability to designate qualified successor physician owners of the shares held by the physician owners of these professional corporations upon the occurrence of certain events, there can be no assurance that we will be able to enforce them under the laws of the respective states or that they will not be challenged by regulatory agencies. Potential conflicts of interest may arise in connection with the administrative services agreements that may have materially different implications for us and the professional corporations and there can be no assurance that it will not harm us. For example, we are generally paid a fixed annual fee on a monthly basis by the professional corporations for our services, which are generally subject to renegotiation on an annual basis. We may be unable to renegotiate acceptable fees, in which event many of the administrative services agreements provide for binding arbitration. If we are unsuccessful in renegotiations or arbitration this could negatively impact our operating margins or result in the termination of our administrative services agreements.

Additionally, we lease 14 of our properties from ownership groups that consist of certain of our directors, officers, principal shareholders, shareholders and employees. Our lease for the Broadway office in Fort Myers, Florida is on a month-to-month basis and there can be no assurance that it will continue in the future. We may be unable to renegotiate these leases when they come up for renewal on terms acceptable to us, if at all.

In October 2003, we replaced our existing third-party medical malpractice insurance coverage with coverage we obtained from a newly-formed insurance entity, which is owned by physicians including Drs. Katin, Dosoretz, Rubenstein and Sheridan. We renewed this coverage in October 2004, 2005 and 2006 which was approved by the audit committee. We may be unable to renegotiate this coverage at acceptable rates and comparable coverage may not be available from third-party insurance companies. If we are unsuccessful in renewing our malpractice insurance coverage, we may not be able to continue to operate without being exposed to substantial risks of claims being made against us for damage awards we are unable to pay.

All transactions between us and any related party after our June 2004 initial public offering are subject to approval by the audit committee and disputes will be handled by the audit committee. There can be no assurance that the above or any future conflicts of interest will be resolved in our favor. If not resolved, such conflicts could harm our business.

In certain states we depend on administrative services agreements with professional corporations, including related party professional corporations, and if we are unable to continue to enter into them or they are terminated, we could be materially harmed.

Certain states, including Alabama, California, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New York and North Carolina, have laws prohibiting business corporations from employing physicians. Our treatment centers in Alabama, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New York and North Carolina, operate through administrative services agreements with professional corporations that employ the radiation oncologists who provide professional services at the treatment centers in those states. In 2004, 2005 and 2006, $45.8 million, $62.2 million and $88.2 million, respectively, of our net patient service revenue was derived from administrative services agreements, as opposed to $117.9 million, $155.4 million and $195.9 million from all of our other centers. The professional corporations in these states are currently owned by certain of our directors, officers and principal shareholders, who are licensed to practice medicine in those states. As we enter into new states that will require an administrative services agreement, there can be no assurance that a related party professional corporation, or any professional corporation, will be willing or able to enter into an administrative services agreement. Furthermore, if we enter into an administrative services agreement with an unrelated party there could be an increased risk of differences arising or future termination. We cannot assure you that a professional corporation will not seek to terminate an agreement with us on the basis that it violates the applicable state laws prohibiting the corporate practice of medicine or any other basis nor can we assure you that governmental authorities in those states will not seek termination of these arrangements on the same basis. While we have not been subject to such proceedings in the past, nor are we currently aware of any other corporations that are subject to such proceedings, we could be materially harmed if any state governmental authorities or the professional corporations with which we have an administrative services agreement were to succeed in such a termination.

We depend on recruiting and retaining radiation oncologists and other qualified healthcare professionals for our success and our ability to enforce the non-competition covenants with radiation oncologists.

Our success is dependent upon our continuing ability to recruit, train and retain or affiliate with radiation oncologists, physicists, dosimetrists, radiation therapists and medical technicians. While there is currently a national shortage of these healthcare professionals, we have not experienced significant problems attracting and retaining key personnel and professionals in the recent past. We face competition for such personnel from other healthcare providers, research and academic institutions, government entities and other organizations. In the event we are unable to recruit and retain these professionals, such shortages could have a material adverse effect on our ability to grow. Additionally, many of our senior radiation oncologists, due to their reputations and experience, are very important in the recruitment and education of radiation oncologists. The loss of any such senior radiation oncologists could negatively impact us.

All of our radiation oncologists except eight are employed under employment agreements which, among other provisions, provide that the radiation oncologists will not compete with us (or the professional corporations contracting with us) for a period of time after employment terminates. Such covenants not to compete are enforced to varying degrees from state to state. In most states, a covenant not to compete will be enforced only to the extent that it is necessary to protect the legitimate business interest of the party seeking enforcement, that it does not unreasonably restrain the party against whom enforcement is sought and that it is not contrary to the public interest. This determination is made based upon all the facts and circumstances of the specific case at the time enforcement is sought. It is unclear whether our interests under our administrative services agreements will be viewed by courts as the type of protected business interest that would permit us or the professional corporations to enforce a non-competition covenant against the radiation oncologists. Since our success depends in substantial part on our ability to preserve the business of our radiation oncologists, a determination that these provisions will not be enforced could have a material adverse effect on us.

We depend on our senior management and we may be materially harmed if we lose any member of our senior management.

We are dependent upon the services of our senior management, especially Dr. Dosoretz, our Chief Executive Officer and President, and Dr. Rubenstein, our Medical Director. We have entered into executive employment agreements with Drs. Dosoretz and Rubenstein. The initial term of the employment agreements is three years and they renew automatically for successive two year terms unless 120 days prior notice is given by either party. Because these members of our senior management team have been with us for over 15 years and have contributed greatly to our growth, their services would be very difficult, time consuming and costly to replace. We carry key-man life insurance on these individuals. The loss of key management personnel or our inability to attract and retain qualified management personnel could have a material adverse effect on us. A decision by any of these individuals to leave our employ, to compete with us or to reduce his involvement on our behalf or as to any professional corporation they have an interest in and to which we provide administrative services, would have a material adverse effect on our business.

A significant number of our treatment centers are concentrated in certain states, particularly Florida, which makes us particularly sensitive to regulatory, economic and other conditions in those states.

Our Florida treatment centers accounted for approximately 64%, 57% and 55% of our total revenues during 2004, 2005 and 2006, respectively. Our treatment centers are also concentrated in the states of Michigan, Nevada, New York and North Carolina, none of which individually currently account for more than 15% of our total revenues, but in the aggregate accounted for approximately 23%, 23% and 20% of our total revenues in 2004, 2005 and 2006, respectively. This concentration makes us particularly sensitive to regulatory laws, including those related to false and improper claims, anti-kickback laws, self-referral laws, fee-splitting, corporate practice of medicine, anti-trust, licensing and certificate of need, as well as economic and other conditions which could impact us. If our treatment centers in these states are adversely affected by changes in regulatory, economic and other conditions, our revenue and profitability may decline. In particular, we employ radiation oncologists and other physicians at our Florida treatment centers and if we are restricted or prohibited from doing so in the future it could significantly harm our business.

Our growth strategy depends in part on our ability to acquire and develop additional treatment centers on favorable terms. If we are unable to do so, our future growth could be limited and our operating results could be adversely affected.

We may be unable to identify, negotiate and complete suitable acquisition and development opportunities on reasonable terms. We began operating our first radiation treatment center in 1983, and have grown to provide radiation therapy at 76 treatment centers. We expect to continue to add additional treatment centers in our existing and new local markets. Our growth, however, will depend on several factors, including:

  •  

our ability to obtain desirable locations for treatment centers in suitable markets;   •  

our ability to identify, recruit and retain or affiliate with a sufficient number of radiation oncologists and other healthcare professionals;   •  

our ability to obtain adequate financing to fund our growth strategy; and   •  

our ability to successfully operate under applicable government regulations. If our growth strategy does not succeed, our business could be harmed.

We may not be able to grow our business effectively or successfully implement our growth plans if we are unable to recruit additional management and other personnel.

Our ability to continue to grow our business effectively and successfully implement our growth strategy is highly dependent upon our ability to attract and retain qualified management employees and other key employees. We believe there are a limited number of qualified people in our business and the industry in which we compete. As such, there can be no assurance that we will be able to identify and retain the key personnel that may be necessary to grow our business effectively or successfully implement our growth strategy. If we are unable to attract and retain talented personnel it could limit our ability to grow our business.

We may encounter numerous business risks in acquiring and developing additional treatment centers, and may have difficulty operating and integrating those treatment centers.

Over the past three years we have acquired 24 treatment centers and developed 5 treatment centers. When we acquire or develop additional treatment centers, we may:

  •  

be unable to successfully operate the treatment centers;   •  

have difficulty integrating their operations and personnel;   •  

be unable to retain radiation oncologists or key management personnel;   •  

be unable to collect the accounts receivable of an acquired treatment center;   •  

acquire treatment centers with unknown or contingent liabilities, including liabilities for failure to comply with healthcare laws and regulations;   •  

experience difficulties with transitioning or integrating the information systems of acquired treatment centers;   •  

be unable to contract with third-party payers or attract patients to our treatment centers; and / or   •  

experience losses and lower gross revenues and operating margins during the initial periods of operating our newly-developed treatment centers. Larger acquisitions, such as our recent acquisition of 7 treatment centers in Southeastern Michigan, can substantially increase our potential exposure to business risks. Furthermore, integrating a new treatment center could be expensive and time consuming, and could disrupt our ongoing business and distract our management and other key personnel.

We may from time to time explore acquisition opportunities outside of the United States when favorable opportunities are available to us. In addition to the risks set forth herein, foreign acquisitions involve unique risks including the particular economic, political and regulatory risks associated with the specific country, currency risks, the relative uncertainty regarding laws and regulations and the potential difficulty of integrating operations across different cultures and languages.

We currently plan to continue to acquire and develop new treatment centers in existing and new local markets. We may not be able to structure economically beneficial arrangements in new markets as a result of healthcare laws applicable to such market or otherwise. If these plans change for any reason or the anticipated schedules for opening and costs of development are revised by us, we may be negatively impacted. In addition, we may incur significant transaction fees and expenses even for potential transactions that are not consummated. We may not be able to integrate and staff these new treatment centers. There can be no assurance that these planned treatment centers will be completed or that, if developed, will achieve sufficient patient volume to generate positive operating margins. If we are unable to timely and efficiently integrate an acquired or newly-developed treatment center, our business could suffer.

We may be subject to actions for false claims if we do not comply with government coding and billing rules which could harm our business.

If we fail to comply with federal and state documentation, coding and billing rules, we could be subject to criminal and/or civil penalties, loss of licenses and exclusion from the Medicare and Medicaid programs, which could harm us. We estimate that approximately 53%, 50% and 52% of our net patient service revenue for 2004, 2005 and 2006, respectively, consisted of payments from Medicare and Medicaid programs. In billing for our services to third-party payers, we must follow complex documentation, coding and billing rules. These rules are based on federal and state laws, rules and regulations, various government pronouncements, and on industry practice. Failure to follow these rules could result in potential criminal or civil liability under the federal False Claims Act, under which extensive financial penalties can be imposed. It could further result in criminal liability under various federal and state criminal statutes. We submit thousands of claims for Medicare and other payments and there can be no assurance that there have been no errors. While we carefully and regularly review our documentation, coding and billing practices as part of our compliance program, the rules are frequently vague and confusing and we cannot assure that governmental investigators, private insurers or private whistleblowers will not challenge our practices. Such a challenge could result in a material adverse effect on our business.

State law limitations and prohibitions on the corporate practice of medicine may materially harm our business and limit how we can operate.

State governmental authorities regulate the medical industry and medical practices extensively. Many states have corporate practice of medicine laws which prohibit us from:

  •  

employing physicians;   •  

practicing medicine, which, in some states, includes managing or operating a radiation treatment center;   •  

certain types of fee arrangements with physicians;   •  

owning or controlling equipment used in a medical practice;   •  

setting fees charged for physician services;   •  

maintaining a physician’s patient records; or   •  

controlling the content of physician advertisements. In addition, many states impose limits on the tasks a physician may delegate to other staff members. We have administrative services agreements in states that prohibit the corporate practice of medicine such as Alabama, California, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New York and North Carolina. Corporate practice of medicine laws and their interpretation vary from state to state, and regulatory authorities enforce them with broad discretion. If we are in violation of these laws, we could be required to restructure our agreements which could materially harm our business and limit how we operate. In the event the corporate practice of medicine laws of other states would adversely limit our ability to operate, it could prevent us from expanding into the particular state and impact our growth strategy.

If we fail to comply with the laws and regulations applicable to our treatment center operations, we could suffer penalties or be required to make significant changes to our operations.

Our treatment center operations are subject to many laws and regulations at the federal, state and local government levels. These laws and regulations require that our treatment centers meet various licensing, certification and other requirements, including those relating to:

  •  

qualification of medical and support persons;   •  

pricing of services by healthcare providers;   •  

the adequacy of medical care, equipment, personnel, operating policies and procedures;   •  

clinic licensure and certificates of need;   •  

maintenance and protection of records; or   •  

environmental protection, health and safety. While we attempt to comply with all applicable laws and regulations some of which can be complex and subject to interpretation, our treatment centers may fail to comply with all applicable laws and regulations. If we fail or have failed to comply with applicable laws and regulations, we could suffer civil or criminal penalties, including becoming the subject of cease and desist orders, rejection of the payment of our claims, the loss of our licenses to operate and our ability to participate in government or private healthcare programs.

If we fail to comply with the federal anti-kickback statute, we could be subject to criminal and civil penalties, loss of licenses and exclusion from the Medicare and Medicaid programs, which could materially harm us.

A provision of the Social Security Act, commonly referred to as the federal anti-kickback statute, prohibits the offer, payment, solicitation or receipt of any form of remuneration in return for referring, ordering, leasing, purchasing or arranging for or recommending the ordering, purchasing or leasing of items or services payable by Medicare, Medicaid or any other federally funded healthcare program. The federal anti-kickback statute is very broad in scope and many of its provisions have not been uniformly or definitively interpreted by existing case law or regulations. All of our financial relationships with healthcare providers are potentially implicated by this statute to the extent Medicare or Medicaid referrals are implicated. Financial relationships covered by this statute can include any relationship where remuneration is provided for referrals including payments not commensurate with fair market value, whether in the form of space, equipment leases, professional or technical services or anything else of value. Violations of the federal anti-kickback statute may result in substantial civil or criminal penalties, including criminal fines of up to $25,000, imprisonment of up to five years, civil penalties under the Civil Monetary Penalties Law of up to $50,000 for each violation, plus three times the remuneration involved, civil penalties under the False Claims Act of up to $11,000 for each claim submitted, plus three times the amounts paid for such claims and exclusion from participation in the Medicare and Medicaid programs. The exclusion, if applied to us or one or more of our subsidiaries or affiliate personnel, could result in significant reductions in our revenues and could have a material adverse effect on our business. In addition, most of the states in which we operate, including Florida, have also adopted laws, similar to the federal anti-kickback statute, that prohibit payments to physicians in exchange for referrals, some of which apply regardless of the source of payment for care. These statutes typically impose criminal and civil penalties as well as loss of licenses.

If we fail to comply with the provision of the Civil Monetary Penalties Law relating to inducements provided to patients, we could be subject to civil penalties and exclusion from the Medicare and Medicaid programs, which could materially harm us.

Under a provision of the federal Civil Monetary Penalties Law, civil monetary penalties (and exclusion) may be imposed on any person who offers or transfers remuneration to any patient who is a Medicare or Medicaid beneficiary, when the person knows or should know that the remuneration is likely to induce the patient to receive medical services from a particular provider. This broad provision applies to many kinds of inducements or benefits provided to patients, including complimentary items, services or transportation that are of more than a nominal value. We have reviewed our practices of providing services to our patients, and have structured those services in a manner that we believe complies with the Law and its interpretation by government authorities. We cannot provide assurances, however, that government authorities will not take a contrary view and impose civil monetary penalties and exclude us for past or present practices.

Our business could be materially harmed by future interpretation or implementation of state laws regarding prohibitions on fee-splitting.

Many states, including Florida where 24 of our 76 treatment centers are located, prohibit the splitting or sharing of fees between physicians and non-physicians. These laws vary from state to state and are enforced by courts and regulatory agencies, each with broad discretion. Some states have interpreted certain types of fee arrangements in practice management agreements between entities and physicians as unlawful fee-splitting. We believe our arrangements with physicians comply in all material respects with the fee-splitting laws of the states in which we operate. Nevertheless, it is possible regulatory authorities or other parties could claim we are engaged in fee-splitting. If such a claim were successfully asserted in any jurisdiction, we and our radiation oncologists could be subject to civil and criminal penalties and we could be required to restructure our contractual and other arrangements. Any restructuring of our contractual and other arrangements with physician practices could result in lower revenue from such practices and reduced influence over the business decisions of such practices. Alternatively, some of our existing contracts could be found to be illegal and unenforceable, which could result in the termination of those contracts and an associated loss of revenue. In addition, expansion of our operations to other states with certain types of fee-splitting prohibitions may require structural and organizational modification to the form of relationships that we currently have with physicians, professional corporations and hospitals.

If our operations in New York are found not to be in compliance with New York law, we may be unable to continue or expand our operations in New York.

We estimate that approximately 9%, 7% and 4% of total revenues for 2004, 2005 and 2006, respectively, was derived from our New York operations. New York law prohibits a business corporation such as us from practicing medicine in the state. As a result, we do not employ radiation oncologists or any other physician or licensed health care provider to provide professional services in New York. We do provide certain management and administrative services to health care providers, including physicians. These services and the payments received for them are regulated by New York law. We believe we have structured our services arrangements with health care providers to comply with these laws. New York also prohibits for-profit corporations from owning a licensed healthcare facility. We do not own any interests in any licensed New York health care facilities. New York additionally has regulations concerning the administration of radiation and rules governing financial and referral relationships with physicians who provide radiation therapy services. Although we believe our operations and relationships in New York are in material compliance with these laws, if New York regulatory authorities or a third party asserts a contrary position, our New York operations could be harmed and we may be unable to continue or expand our operations in New York.

If a federal or state agency asserts a different position or enacts new laws or regulations regarding illegal payments under the Medicare, Medicaid or other governmental programs, we may be subject to civil and criminal penalties, experience a significant reduction in our revenue or be excluded from participation in the Medicare, Medicaid or other governmental programs.

Any change in interpretations or enforcement of existing or new laws and regulations could subject our current business practices to allegations of impropriety or illegality, or could require us to make changes in our treatment centers, equipment, personnel, services, pricing or capital expenditure programs, which could increase our operating expenses and have a material adverse effect on our operations or reduce the demand for or profitability of our services.

Additionally, new federal or state laws may be enacted that would cause our relationships with our radiation oncologists to become illegal or result in the imposition of penalties against us or our treatment centers. If any of our business arrangements with our radiation oncologists or other physicians in a position to make referrals of radiation therapy services were deemed to violate the federal anti-kickback statute or similar laws, or if new federal or state laws were enacted rendering these arrangements illegal, our business would be adversely affected.

If we fail to comply with physician self-referral laws as they are currently interpreted or may be interpreted in the future, or if other legislative restrictions are issued, we could incur a significant loss of reimbursement revenue.

We are subject to federal and state statutes and regulations banning payments for referrals of patients and referrals by physicians to healthcare providers with whom the physicians have a financial relationship and billing for services provided pursuant to such referrals if any occur. The federal Stark Law applies to Medicare and Medicaid and prohibits a physician from referring patients for certain services, including radiation therapy, radiology and laboratory services, to an entity with which the physician has a financial relationship. Financial relationship includes both investment interests in an entity and compensation arrangements with an entity. The state laws and regulations vary significantly from state to state, are often vague and, in many cases, have not been interpreted by courts or regulatory agencies. These state laws and regulations generally apply to services reimbursed by both governmental and private payers. Violation of these federal and state laws and regulations may result in prohibition of payment for services rendered, loss of licenses, fines, criminal penalties and exclusion from Medicare and Medicaid programs.

We have financial relationships with our physicians, as defined by the federal Stark Law, in the form of compensation arrangements and ownership of our common stock issued by us in connection with acquisitions. We also have financial arrangements with physicians who refer Medicare and Medicaid patients to us, which relationships are also subject to the Stark Law. We rely on certain exceptions to self-referral laws including an exception for radiation oncologists referrals of radiation therapy services, as well as employee, group practice and in-office ancillary services exceptions, that we believe are applicable to our arrangements. In a limited number of markets we have relationships with non-radiation oncology physicians such as surgical and gynecological oncologists and urologists that are members of a group practice with our radiation oncologists and we rely on the group practice exception to self-referral laws with respect to such relationships. While we believe that our financial relationships with physicians and referral practices are in material compliance with applicable laws and regulations, government authorities might take a contrary position or prohibited referrals may occur. We cannot be

certain that physicians who own our common stock or hold promissory notes will not violate these laws or that we will have knowledge of the identity of all beneficial owners of our common stock. If our financial relationships with physicians were found to be illegal, or if prohibited referrals were found to have been made, we could be subject to civil and criminal penalties, including fines, exclusion from participation in government and private payer programs and requirements to refund amounts previously received from government and private payers. In addition, expansion of our operations to new jurisdictions, or new interpretations of laws in our existing jurisdictions, could require structural and organizational modifications of our relationships with physicians to comply with that jurisdiction’s laws. Such structural and organizational modifications could result in lower profitability and failure to achieve our growth objectives.

Our costs and potential risks have increased as a result of the regulations relating to privacy and security of patient information.

There are numerous federal and state regulations addressing patient information privacy and security concerns. In particular, the federal regulations issued under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, or HIPAA, contain provisions that:

  •  

protect individual privacy by limiting the uses and disclosures of patient information;   •  

require the implementation of security safeguards to ensure the confidentiality, integrity and availability of individually identifiable health information in electronic form; and   •  

prescribe specific transaction formats and data code sets for certain electronic healthcare transactions. Compliance with these regulations requires us to spend money and our management to spend substantial time and resources. We believe that we are in material compliance with the HIPAA regulations with which we are currently required to comply. The HIPAA regulations expose us to increased regulatory risk if we fail to comply. If we fail to comply with the new regulations, we could suffer civil penalties up to $100 per violation with a maximum penalty of $25,000 per each requirement violated per calendar year and criminal penalties with fines up to $250,000 per violation, and our business could be harmed.

Efforts to regulate the construction, acquisition or expansion of healthcare treatment centers could prevent us from developing or acquiring additional treatment centers or other facilities or renovating our existing treatment centers.

Many states have enacted certificate of need laws which require prior approval for the construction, acquisition or expansion of healthcare treatment centers. In giving approval, these states consider the need for additional or expanded healthcare treatment centers or services. In the states of Kentucky, North Carolina and Rhode Island in which we currently operate, certificates of need must be obtained for capital expenditures exceeding a prescribed amount, changes in capacity or services offered and various other matters. Other states in which we now or may in the future operate may also require certificates of need under certain circumstances not currently applicable to us. We cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain the certificates of need or other required approvals for additional or expanded treatment centers or services in the future. In addition, at the time we acquire a treatment center, we may agree to replace or expand the acquired treatment center. If we are unable to obtain required approvals, we may not be able to acquire additional treatment centers or other facilities, expand the healthcare services we provide at these treatment centers or replace or expand acquired treatment centers.

Our business may be harmed by technological and therapeutic changes.

The treatment of cancer patients is subject to potentially revolutionary technological and therapeutic changes. Future technological developments could render our equipment obsolete. We may incur significant costs in replacing or modifying equipment in which we have already made a substantial investment prior to the end of its anticipated useful life. In addition, there may be significant advances in other cancer treatment methods, such as chemotherapy, surgery, biological therapy, or in cancer prevention techniques, which could reduce demand or even eliminate the need for the radiation therapy services we provide.

We maintain a significant amount of debt to further our business or growth strategies.

As of December 31, 2006, we had outstanding debt of $205.2 million. Approximately $123.0 million is available for borrowing in the future under our fourth amended and restated senior secured credit facility. Our significant indebtedness could have adverse consequences and could limit our business as follows:

  •  

a substantial portion our cash flows from operations may go to repayment of principal and interest on our indebtedness and we would have less funds available for our operations;   •  

our senior credit facility contains numerous financial and other restrictive covenants, including restrictions on purchasing assets, selling assets, paying dividends to our shareholders and incurring additional indebtedness;   •  

as a result of our debt we may be vulnerable to adverse general economic and industry conditions and we may have less flexibility in reacting to changes in these conditions; or   •  

competitors with greater access to capital could have a significant advantage over us. We may need to raise additional capital, which may be difficult to obtain at attractive prices and which may cause us to engage in financing transactions that adversely affect our stock price.

We may need capital for growth, acquisitions, development, integration of operations and technology and equipment in the future. Any additional capital would be raised through public or private offerings of equity securities or debt financings. Our issuance of additional equity securities could cause dilution to holders of our common stock and may adversely affect the market price of our common stock. The incurrence of additional debt could increase our interest expense and other debt service obligations and could result in the imposition of covenants that restrict our operational and financial flexibility. Additional capital may not be available to us on commercially reasonable terms or at all. The failure to raise additional needed capital could impede the implementation of our operating and growth strategies.

Our information systems are critical to our business and a failure of those systems could materially harm us.

We depend on our ability to store, retrieve, process and manage a significant amount of information, and to provide our radiation treatment centers with efficient and effective accounting and scheduling systems. Our information systems require maintenance and upgrading to meet our needs, which could significantly increase our administrative expenses. Furthermore, if our information systems fail to perform as expected, or if we suffer an interruption, malfunction or loss of information processing capabilities, it could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Our financial results could be adversely affected by the increasing costs of professional liability insurance and by successful malpractice claims.

We are exposed to the risk of professional liability and other claims against us and our radiation oncologists and other physicians and professionals arising out of patient medical treatment at our treatment centers. Our risk exposure as it relates to our non-radiation oncology physicians could be greater than with our radiation oncologists to the extent such non-radiation oncology physicians are engaged in diagnostic activities. Malpractice claims, if successful, could result in substantial damage awards which might exceed the limits of any applicable insurance coverage. Insurance against losses of this type can be expensive and insurance premiums are expected to increase significantly in the near future. Insurance rates vary from state to state, by physician specialty and other factors. The rising costs of insurance premiums, as well as successful malpractice claims against us or one of our physicians, could have a material adverse effect on our financial position and results of operations.

It is also possible that our excess liability and other insurance coverage will not continue to be available at acceptable costs or on favorable terms. In addition, our insurance does not cover all potential liabilities arising from governmental fines and penalties, indemnification agreements and certain other uninsurable losses. For example, from time to time we agree to indemnify third parties, such as hospitals and clinical laboratories, for various claims that may not be covered by insurance. As a result, we may become responsible for substantial damage awards that are uninsured.

The radiation therapy market is highly competitive.

Radiation therapy is a highly competitive business in each market in which we operate. Our treatment centers face competition from hospitals, other medical practitioners and other operators of radiation treatment centers. There is a growing trend of physicians in specialties other than radiation oncology, such as urology, entering the radiation treatment business including medical specialties that would otherwise be sources of referrals. If this trend continues it could harm our referrals and our business. Certain of our competitors have longer operating histories and significantly greater financial and other resources than us. Competitors with greater access to financial resources may enter our markets and compete with us. We have recently noticed an increase in multi-state competitors in some of the markets in which we operate. In the event that we are not able to compete successfully, our business may be adversely affected and competition may make it more difficult for us to affiliate with additional radiation oncologists on terms that are favorable to us.

Our financial results may suffer if we have to write-off goodwill or other intangible assets.

A portion of our total assets consist of goodwill and other intangible assets. Goodwill and other intangible assets, net of accumulated amortization, accounted for 27.8% and 36.7% of the total assets on our balance sheet as of December 31, 2005 and 2006, respectively. As a result of our acquisition activity, goodwill significantly increased to approximately $138.8 million from approximately $66.5 million as of December 31, 2005. We may not realize the value of our goodwill or other intangible assets. We expect to engage in additional transactions that will result in our recognition of additional goodwill or other intangible assets. We evaluate on a regular basis whether events and circumstances have occurred that indicate that all or a portion of the carrying amount of goodwill or other intangible assets may no longer be recoverable, and is therefore impaired. Under current accounting rules, any determination that impairment has occurred would require us to write-off the impaired portion of our goodwill or the unamortized portion of our intangible assets, resulting in a charge to our earnings. Such a write-off could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Our failure to comply with laws related to hazardous materials could materially harm us.

Our treatment centers provide specialized treatment involving the use of radioactive material in the treatment of the lungs, prostate, breasts, cervix and other organs. The materials are obtained from, and, if not permanently placed in a patient or used up, returned to, a third-party provider of supplies to hospitals and other radiation therapy practices, which has the ultimate responsibility for its proper disposal. We, however, remain subject to state and federal laws regulating the protection of employees who may be exposed to hazardous material and regulating the proper handling, storage and disposal of that material. Although we believe we are in compliance with all applicable laws, a violation of such laws, or the future enactment of more stringent laws or regulations, could subject us to liability, or require us to incur costs that would have a material adverse effect on us.

Because our principal shareholders and management own a large percentage of our common stock, they will collectively be able to determine the outcome of all matters submitted to shareholders for approval regardless of the preferences of our other shareholders.

As of February 1, 2007 certain of our officers beneficially owned approximately 44.6% of our outstanding common stock and serve on our board of directors. As a result, these persons have a significant influence over the outcome of matters requiring shareholder approval including the power to:

  •  

elect our entire board of directors;   •  

control our management and policies;   •  

agree to mergers, consolidations and the sale of all or substantially all of our assets;   •  

prevent or cause a change in control; and   •  

amend our amended and restated articles of incorporation and bylaws at any time. Our stock price may fluctuate and you may not be able to resell your shares of our common stock at or above the price you paid.

We became a public company on June 18, 2004 and there can be no assurance that we will be able to maintain an active market for our stock. A number of factors could cause the market price of our common stock be volatile. Some of the factors that could cause our stock price to fluctuate significantly, include:

  •  

variations in our financial performance;   •  

changes in recommendations or financial estimates by securities analysts, or our failure to meet or exceed estimates;   •  

announcements by us or our competitors of material events;   •  

future sales of our common stock;   •  

investor perceptions of us and the healthcare industry;   •  

announcements regarding purported class action lawsuits by plaintiff lawfirms; and   •  

general economic trends and market conditions. As a result, you may not be able to resell your shares at or above the price you paid.

Sales of substantial amounts of our common stock, by our senior management shareholders could adversely affect our stock price and limit our ability to raise capital.

As of February 1, 2007, our senior management shareholders beneficially owned approximately 45.0% of our common stock. The market price of our common stock could decline as a result of sales by senior management of substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market or the perception that substantial sales could occur. These sales also may make it more difficult for us to sell common stock in the future to raise capital.

Florida law and certain anti-takeover provisions of our corporate documents and our executive employment agreements could entrench our management or delay or prevent a third party from acquiring us or a change in control even if it would benefit our shareholders.

Our amended and restated articles of incorporation and bylaws and our executive employment agreements contain a number of provisions that may delay, deter or inhibit a future acquisition or change in control that is not first approved by our board of directors. This could occur even if our shareholders receive an attractive offer for their shares or if a substantial number or even a majority of our shareholders believe the takeover may be in their best interest. These provisions are intended to encourage any person interested in acquiring us to negotiate with and obtain approval from our board of directors prior to pursuing a transaction. Provisions that could delay, deter or inhibit a future acquisition or change in control include the following:

  •  

10,000,000 shares of blank check preferred stock that may be issued by our board of directors without shareholder approval and that may be substantially dilutive or contain preferences or rights objectionable to an acquiror;   •  

a classified board of directors with staggered, three-year terms so that only a portion of our directors are subject to election at each annual meeting;   •  

the ability of our board of directors to amend our bylaws without shareholder approval;   •  

special meetings of shareholders cannot be called by a shareholder;   •  

obligations to make certain payments under executive employment agreements in the event of a change in control; and   •  

Florida statutes which restrict or prohibit “control share acquisitions” and certain transactions with affiliated parties and permit the adoption of “poison pills” without shareholder approval. These provisions could also discourage bids for our common stock at a premium and cause the market price of our common stock to decline. In addition, these provisions may also entrench our management by preventing or frustrating any attempt by our shareholders to replace or remove our current management.

Other than S Corporation distributions and our special distribution, we have not paid dividends and do not expect to in the future, which means that the value of our shares cannot be realized except through sale.

Other than S Corporation distributions to our shareholders, including our special distribution in April 2004 prior to our initial public offering, we have never declared or paid cash dividends. We currently expect to retain earnings for our business and do not anticipate paying dividends on our common stock at any time in the foreseeable future. Because we do not anticipate paying dividends in the future, it is likely that the only opportunity to realize the value of our common stock will be through a sale of those shares. The decision whether to pay dividends on common stock will be made by the board of directors from time to time in the exercise of its business judgment. Furthermore, we are currently restricted from paying dividends by the terms of our senior secured credit facility.

If we fail to maintain an effective system of internal controls, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results which could subject us to regulatory sanctions, harm our business and operating results and cause the trading price of our stock to decline.

We are required under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 to evaluate our internal controls for effectiveness. Effective internal controls are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports. If we cannot provide reliable financial reports, our business, reputation and operating results could be harmed. We have in the past discovered, and may in the future discover, areas of our internal controls that need improvement. For example, in early May 2005 we identified a material weakness related to our controls over lease accounting, which caused us to restate our prior financial statements. While we have since remediated the material weakness to ensure proper lease accounting in the future and believe that we currently have adequate internal controls, there can be no assurance that we will be able to implement and maintain adequate controls in the future. We cannot be certain that these measures will ensure that we implement and maintain adequate controls over our financial processes and reporting in the future. Any failure to implement required new or improved controls, or difficulties encountered in their implementation, could subject us to regulatory sanctions, harm our business and operating results or cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations. Inferior internal controls could also harm our reputation and cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, which could have a negative impact on the trading price of our stock.

We have treatment centers in Florida and other areas that could be disrupted or damaged by hurricanes.

Florida is susceptible to hurricanes and we currently have 24 radiation treatment centers located in Florida. Our Florida centers accounted for approximately 55% of our total revenues during 2006. In 2005, 21 of our treatment centers in South Florida were disrupted by Hurricane Wilma which required us to close all of these centers for a business day. Although none of these treatment centers suffered structural damage as a result of the hurricane, their utility services were disrupted. Our patients and employees were also affected by Hurricane Wilma. While we do not anticipate that Hurricane Wilma will have any long-term impact on our business, our Florida treatment centers and any of our other treatment centers located in other areas that are in the path of a hurricane could be subject to significant hurricane-related disruptions and/or damage in the future. If our treatment centers suffer any significant hurricane-related disruptions and/or damage in the future it could have an adverse affect on our business and financial results. We carry property damage and business interruption insurance on our facilities, but there can be no assurance that it would be adequate to cover all of our hurricane-related losses.

We are not currently in compliance with the NASDAQ requirement that a majority of our board of directors be comprised of independent members.

NASDAQ Marketplace Rules require that the majority of our board of directors be comprised of independent members. As a result of the recent death of independent director James Charles Weeks in early January of this year, we are currently not in compliance with this requirement. We have a cure period from NASDAQ that gives until the later of out next annual shareholders meeting or July 9, 2007 to regain compliance. We plan to add a new independent member to our board as soon as practicable. If we fail to regain compliance in a timely manner, we could face delisting which could adversely impact the trading market for our stock.

Forward looking statements. Some of the information set forth in this report contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. We may make other written and oral communications from time to time that contain such statements. Forward-looking statements, including statements as to industry trends, future expectations and other matters that do not relate strictly to historical facts are based on certain assumptions by management. These statement are often identified by the use of words such as “may,” “will,” “expect,” “plans,” “believe,” “ anticipate,” “intend,” “could,” “estimate,” or “continue” and similar expressions or variations, and are based on the beliefs and assumptions of our management based on information then currently available to management. Such forward-looking statements are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from future results expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements include, among others, the risks discussed herein under the heading “Risk Factors.” We caution readers to carefully consider such factors. Further, such forward-looking statements speak only as of the date on which such statements are made and we undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date of such statements.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

None


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